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Archive for the ‘book blog’ Category

Lying in Wait

 Author: Liz Nugent
Published: 7 July 2016
Reviewed: 6 August 2016 
5 out of 5 Stars
Copy supplied by Penguin Books (UK) in return for an honest review
Description:
 

The last people who expect to be meeting with a drug-addicted prostitute are a respected judge and his reclusive wife. And they certainly don’t plan to kill her and bury her in their exquisite suburban garden.

Yet Andrew and Lydia Fitzsimons find themselves in this unfortunate situation.

While Lydia does all she can to protect their innocent son Laurence and their social standing, her husband begins to falls apart.

But Laurence is not as naïve as Lydia thinks. And his obsession with the dead girl’s family may be the undoing of his own.

My Thoughts & Review:

Lying in Wait is one of those books that sets the tone right from the opening lines.  
Set in Dublin in 1980, the reader meets Lydia Fitzsimmons, a formidable woman with an utterly warped personality who has driven her husband to murder.  Instead of being a traditional murder story where all clues point to the mysterious perpetrator, this story takes the reader on a journey through the motivations for killing, the messes left behind after murder and gives an insight in to the psychology behind it.

With narration from Lydia, the reader is privy to her thoughts which is interesting as it gives a chilling insight to this character and her conniving ways.  Something other characters are unaware of throughout the story which makes it more enjoyable to read.  
Narration also comes from Lydia and Andrew’s son Laurence and Karen Doyle, the sister of the victim.  

All of the characters are expertly created, some that the reader cannot help but hate.  Lydia is one such character, she is narcissistic, manipulative and verging on sociopathic.  Her obsessive tendencies toward her son are claustrophobic; feeling she “owns” him because she gave birth to him, controlling aspects of his life including the foods he eats.   
Karen is a fantastic character, and one that readers will struggle not to feel sympathy for and like.  She’s strong and loves her sister deeply, her determination to find out what happened to her sister is moving.   

With short chapters, this book moves along at a great pace, falling victim to “just one more chapter before bed” I read this in one night.  Nugent is a very skilled writer, evoking a wealth of emotion from readers, creating characters that make the blood boil with rage, and creating a storyline so thoroughly dark and twisted.

A gripping read, dark and extremely thought provoking.  

You can buy a copy of Lying in Wait here. 

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As If I Were A River

Author: Amanda Saint
Published: 14 April 2016
Reviewed: 5 August 2016
4 out of 5 stars 
Copy supplied by Urbane Publications in return for an honest review
Description:
When we discover the truth about others, we find ourselves…

Kate has a safe, happy, ordinary existence. Or so she thinks. When her husband Jimmy goes missing she is forced to re-evaluate every aspect of her life, and must confront the past to find a future. Kate hasnt seen her mother, Laura, for 25 years, and she cannot seek solace from her estranged father. Can Una, her paternal grandmother, provide answers about those who have seemingly abandoned her, and help her come to terms with the loss of those she loves?

‘As If I Were a River’ is the emotional story of three generations of women and the impact of their actions upon each other…and themselves. It is a story of buried secrets, and of finding the courage to question the life you lead. Are we forever shaped by our past, or can we find redemption in making our own future?  

My Thoughts & Review:

“When we discover the truth about others, we find ourselves..” is an incredibly fitting phrase for this book.  So many things impact upon us, our lives and the decisions we make and this book highlighted that through a clear and concise story. 
As the début novel for Amanda Saint, I was unsure what to expect when I picked this one up.  Her writing style is simplistic but efficient, it is the characters that tell the story in this book without the typical preamble and purple prose.     

Life changes completely for Kate following the disappearance of her husband Jimmy one night, she struggles to cope with his absence, which in turn forces her to face her issues with abandonment – her mother left when she was a child, Kate never knew why.  In order to move forward, Kate has to address the secrets that surround her mother’s mysterious reappearance.   

Written from the perspectives of the three female characters, each generation reveals more about their own tale with every chapter.  All of the tales are then neatly woven together to form a thought provoking story. 

Kate is an odd character, in the sense that in the beginning it is hard to feel much emotion or attachment towards her, spending most of her time drunk or stoned she came across as very self indulgent.  However, as the story progressed I felt empathy for her plight and deeply wanted things to stop spiralling out of control for her.   

Laura, Kate’s mother is also a character worthy of note.  As a young woman finding her way in life, she meets a man, falls in love and ends up married with two children before realising she‘s missed out on having a life.  Struggling to cope with this realisation she makes a bold decision, one that will have astronomical consequences for herself and her family.  
 
This is not a fast paced book,  but it is entirely consuming.  It’s a fascinating and and compelling read.
 
You can buy a copy of As If I Were A River here.  

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Good Girl Bad Girl


4 out of 5 stars

Copy supplied by Kate at Authoright in return for an honest review as part of the blog tour


Description:

A stalker. A pact. And a deadly secret.
How far must Kal go to face the truth and find her missing mother?
A new, dangerous, psychological suspense thriller.
Kal is twenty-eight years old and she’s no fool, though sometimes she might pretend to be, because hiding her strengths is a great way to extract information.
An expert in psychology and skilled in reading other people and their behaviours, she first learnt her craft from her deceased father. He was a man with dark secrets.
When her journalist mother goes missing, Kal investigates. A shadow’s been stalking her family for three generations. Kal will uncover a child trafficking network and to find her mother, she must face her deepest suspicions and a dread she’s been avoiding all her life…
My Thoughts & Review:
As a freelance journalist working in dangerous and hostile environments, it takes a lot to raise the suspicions of Kal Medi.  So when her mother Alesha phones her whilst on assignment on the other side of the globe to drop everything to assist her with a project, Kal suspects nothing untoward, and assures  Alesha she will come back.  
The next call Kal receives is from Alesha’s best friend, in a panic because Alesha has disappeared.  Knowing that something is not right, Kal heads home to investigate.  Seeing nothing out of place in her mother’s home, Kal’s attention is piqued by a threatening note left in plain sight, why did her mother leave this lying?  And more importantly, what could this signify?   The notes are a common occurrence for her family, both her grandmother and mother have been recipients of these but always destroyed them whilst brushing off Kal’s curiosities.    
Kal turns detective, determined to find out what has happened to Alesha, but with no idea where to start she visits her grandmother Nannie to break the news and to find out what she knows about the letters.  
Travelling to India leads Kal to the most earth shattering discoveries.  When she realises the depths of the corruption and perversion involved, she knows she must do all she can to stop those involved.
Experienced in martial arts, expert in psychology and a skilled people watcher, Kal Medi is an interesting character.  The crafting of this character has been so cleverly done – a strong and independent woman because of her childhood.  Her unorthodox “training” with her father gave her the tools to succeed in life but also made her deeply mistrusting of people to the point she is alone.  
The supporting characters balance out Kal’s personality well, her best friend Marty and new friend LeeMing add a calm and balance to her arguments for action, more than once their collective sense prevailing to keep Kal safe.  Nannie is a wonderful character, her good days are a delight to read, the advice she gives to Kal reminds me of my own grandmother, insightful and just the right amount of verbal kick up the rear end.  

Girdharry demonstrates superb writing in this book, her attention to detail is second to none.  The reader can feel the intensity of the situations Kal finds herself in, envision the sights of India and the children, and experience the frustration Kal feels searching for Alesha.
  
Due to the disturbing nature of some aspects of this book, I would urge caution to some readers, especially younger ones.  This can be an uncomfortable read, reference to child trafficking and abuse are not subjects that everyone is comfortable reading about.  
That said, this is gripping read, fraught with tension, intrigue and danger.  Very cleverly written, the pace was slow to begin with but once it picked up, there was no holding back, “just one more chapter before bed” wasn’t even uttered….I read this in one sitting, it had me hooked.
You can buy a copy of Good Girl Bad Girl here.  
 
About The Author:

Born and educated in the UK, Ann Girdharry is a trained psychotherapist and has worked as a manager in the not-for- profit sector for many years for agencies working with: carers, vulnerable older people and those with dementia, survivors of abuse, and victims of racism and racial attacks. 
Today she lives in Montpellier, France with her husband and two children. As well as her passion for writing, Ann enjoys gardening and is a member of her local rollerblading club. 
Ann has previously published a series of short stories called Tales of the Unexpected (2015-2016). 
Her début novel, and the first in the Kal Medi series, Good Girl Bad Girl by Ann Girdharry (published by CreateSpace and Kindle Direct Publishing 23rd August 2016 RRP £8.99 paperback, £3.99 ebook) is available to purchase from online retailers including amazon.co.uk and to order from all good bookstores.
For more information about Ann Girdharry, go to www.girdharry.com or follow her on Twitter at @GirdharryAnn

 

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The Disappearance

Author: Annabel Kantaria
Published: 21 April 2016
Reviewed: 4 August 2016
4 out of 5 stars
Copy supplied by Harlequin (UK) Limited, MIRA UK in return for an honest review


Description:

Audrey Templeton wants to spend her 70th birthday with her children on a once-in-a-lifetime cruise. Neither John or Lexi are overjoyed by a week with their widowed, increasingly forgetful mother, but reluctantly agree.


Celebrating at the ship’s famous White Night party, Audrey reveals that although their domineering father left them nothing, when she dies John and Lexi will inherit a life-changing sum. With both children facing financial difficulties, the news is a huge relief.


Then Audrey disappears. The search moves from the ship to the Mediterranean Sea beyond, but there is no trace – she has simply vanished.


As John and Lexi investigate, clues to their mother’s past emerge – a past in India, of scandal and tragedy – hidden until now. Soon they start to wonder if they ever really knew Audrey, and whether they can trust one another… 

My Thoughts & Review: 

The very opening pages of this book immediately grab the reader’s attention, the captain of a cruise ship is calling off the search for a missing passenger who is suspected to have gone overboard.  The passenger in question is Audrey Templeton, celebrating her 70th birthday with her grown up children on a cruise of the Greek Islands.

The author then takes us back to the 1970s where we encounter a much younger Audrey aboard a boat destined for India where her friend Janet lives.  The death of both of her parents in quick succession sees her needing a change in her life, and this seems the obvious one to make.  Her new life in India begins when she meets a dark and mysterious stranger in a coffee bar, there is an attraction there and the pair are married within 6 months, she also becomes mother to her new husband’s twins John and Lexi.  Unfortunately for Audrey, it’s not the Disney fairytale she would have hoped for, a horrific incident brings about their return to London.

Annabel Kantaria continues to weave back and forth between the 1970s and 2013 to tell the tale of Audrey’s life, right up to the point that John wants to put his 69 year old mother into a form of sheltered accommodation.  Without saying anything more through worry of giving too much away,  I will add that Audrey disappears just after telling the twins that they will inherit a fortune……

The plot was easy to follow, the way the story moved back and forth through Audrey‘s life was well written and gave the reader a greater insight into this character and her relationships.  Kantaria has a very enjoyable style of writing, it makes for an easy and enjoyable read, she builds suspense well and ensures that the reader is gripped and interested throughout.  Vivid descriptions of the settings really brought the story to life, as did the wonderful cast of characters.  Audrey in particular is a wonderful character, one that you begin to feel a connection to in her younger years, living in India with a controlling husband and his children that she struggles to connect with.    

Family secrets are always interesting to read about and this is definitely a book that has this in spades!  A compelling and thrilling read.

You can buy a copy of The Disappearance here.   

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Four Weddings and a Fiasco

Author: Catherine Ferguson
Published: 16 June 2016
Reviewed: 3 August 2016

4.5 out of 5 stars

Copy supplied by HarperCollins UK, Avon in return for an honest review


Description:

Katy Peacock lives a life as colourful as her name.

As a wedding photographer, she spends her days making other people smile as she captures all sorts of fun and capers at celebrations that range from the wacky to the wild.

But her own life isn’t looking quite so rosy. Her mum is acting out of character, her menacing ex is back on the scene, and she is torn between two gorgeous men. And that’s before we even get started on the trouble her sister is causing…

As Katy weathers the ups and downs of the season, she revisits problems from the past, discovers new friendships and finds that four weddings and a fiasco have the power to change her world beyond measure.

My Thoughts & Review:

An enjoyable read, in fact, a pretty good summer read and one you could happily pack with your luggage to read when you’re away on a break.  

Katy Peacock is a wedding photographer in a lovely little village, but after a bad fall out with her sister two years ago she is finding it hard to manage her photography business alone.  
She’s also trying desperately to steer clear of men, so when she falls into the arms of a gorgeous man after trying to climb over her fence, the reader knows things won’t go as Katy plans.

Katy is a great character, very likeable.  She’s independent and determined to work hard to solve her financial issues which includes paying back an ex boyfriend.  But in spite of her own issues, she always has time for her friends and family, and always has a word of advice or sympathetic shoulder for her prospective brides.  Mallory, Katy’s best friend is another brilliant character, well created and very likeable.  Her down to earth perception on life and events provides light relief to Katy’s moments of doom and the pair really come across as believable. 

The story is broken into four parts, each is a season with a different wedding which allows the story to move briskly and keeps the reader focused.
The dialogue is well written, adding an authenticity to situations and relationships – in particular the relationship between Katy and her mother and Katy’s struggles to reconnect with her sister.  The writing overall is solid, the story flows well and with plenty humour interspersed this makes it a witty and enjoyable read.  

Despite thinking I knew where the story was going I still really enjoyed this book, it held my attention and it was an easy read so I was reading “just one more chapter before bed”, and before I knew it I’d finished the book!  

A lovely feel good book, brings a little light relief from everyday life and a welcome escape just when you need it most.  

You can buy a copy of Four Weddings and a Fiasco here.

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 Dance With The Dead

Author: James Nally
Published: 28 July 2016
Reviewed: 2 August 2016
5 out of 5 stars
Copy supplied by HarperCollins UK, Avon in return for an honest review
Description: 
Aspiring actress Elizabeth Smart lands her centre stage role: her mutilated body is found dumped in North London’s red light district.  Clasped in her hand is a piece of human hair belonging to an unidentified body of a woman murdered two weeks ago.  

PC Donal lands himself a place on the murder squad just as his unconventional brother, journalist Finton, unearths the secret double life of Elizabeth. 

The bodies mount, each clinging to the strands of hair belonging to the previous victim.  The police are convinced it’s the act of a serial killer.  But how does Donal convince them it’s not?
The only people he can trust are the victims he dances with in his dreams.  

My Thoughts & Review:
Dance With The Dead sees the welcome return of PC Donal Lynch.  For anyone not familiar with this character, the first book Alone With The Dead is utterly brilliant and well worth a read.  This can be read as a standalone, but why deprive yourself of James Nally’s writing?  

We open in early 1990s London and Donal has been moved to the Cold Crime Unit, a punishment for his behaviour at the end of book one.  The discovery of a mutilated body in the Red Light District is the perfect opportunity for Donal to ingratiate himself back in to the embrace of the Murder Squad.  His work on cold cases involving prostitutes leads him to believe there is a connection between the historical cases and this new body.  

With “help” from his journalist brother Fintan, Donal really has to be careful walking this tightrope.  When the patriarch of the Lynch family unexpectedly arrives from Ireland, a spanner is thrown into the works.  Donal already having a seriously troubled relationship with his father because of the connections to the IRA and the Troubles finds juggling the presence of his father, attempting to solve the mystery of the murdered woman and the budding romance with Zoe from Forensic Science Service almost too much to handle. 

As the case escalates the cover ups, deception, political intrigue and corruption intensify.  London’s gangsters, police corruption, IRA, Irish Peace Talks, Special Branch and paedophilia are just some of the things involved in this multi layered wonder. 

Happily, the author has continued on Donal’s sleep paralysis, and this time it enriches the story so much more.  Plagued by hangovers, his ghostly visions seem to haunt him even when awake.  Nally cleverly writes this aspect of the story to allow the reader to interpret it as though it’s in Donal’s head, a bad dream if you will, however I like to think of it as it’s his “old fashioned gut instinct” talking to him.  

Donal is a wonderful character, so thoroughly well written.  He’s a tortured soul, with an incredibly dry sense of humour and a loving for Shiraz.  His brother Fintan is another brilliant character, incredibly unscrupulous.  I was delighted to see him appearing more in this book, and found myself liking him and his antics more than I had previously.    

Once again, Nally has given the reader a book that transports them back in time.  Referencing events from the early 1990s, giving a history lesson about the Irish-British Troubles, he takes the reader right into the heart of dark atmospheric world he has scripted.  Setting and atmosphere are key in thrillers, and this book has it in abundance.

James Nally is a gifted writer, he constructs a a book that is dark, twisted, and mercilessly violent but at the same time it is rich with humour and wit (at times the inappropriateness of the humour is what makes it even funnier).  It is so cleverly plotted, layer upon layer of detail brings this story to life, the characters come alive and the atmosphere feels real.     

I cannot wait to see what James Nally comes up with next for Donal, just please don’t make me wait too long to find out!

You can buy a copy of Dance With The Dead here. 

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The Silent Twin

Author: Caroline Mitchell
Published: 14 April 2016
Reviewed: 1 August 2016

5 out of 5 Stars

Copy supplied by Bookouture in return for an honest review


Description:

I’m alone in the dark, please can you find me …

Nine-year-old twins Abigail and Olivia vow never to be parted. But when Abigail goes missing from Blackwater Farm, DC Jennifer Knight must find her before it’s too late.

Twin sister Olivia has been mute since Abigail’s disappearance. But when she whispers in Jennifer’s ear, Jennifer realises it is Abigail’s voice pleading to be found.

A damp and decaying house set in acres of desolate scrubland, the farm is a place of secrets, old and new – and Jennifer must unravel them all in order to find the lost girl. But could Olivia’s bond with her twin hold the key to finding Abigail? And can Jennifer break through her silence in time to save her sister’s life? 

My Thoughts & Review:

The Silent Twin is the third book in the DC Jennifer Knight and quite frankly Caroline Mitchell has really set herself a high target to beat for any further books in this series – this book really is that good!

For those that have not read Don’t Turn Around or Time to Die, then fear not this book works well as a standalone, however I would absolutely recommend seeking out the previous books.  I say this not because you need to so that you will fully understand the back stories but more because Mitchell demonstrates awe inspiring skill in her writing.  Initially setting a pace akin to a comfortable and steady read, the intensity escalates to the point the reader is almost on the edge of their seat, desperately trying to master speed reading to find out what is going to happen next. 
As with the first two books, DC Jennifer Knight finds herself involved with a case that draws on her unique abilities, and from the very start this case is not going to be easy.  Twin sisters Olivia and Abigail were playing hide and seek at Blackwater Farm but Abigail soon disappears.  Following the disappearance of her sister, Olivia stops talking and it is down to Jennifer Knight to try and find out what she can from the mute twin.  This coupled with strange happenings in the house means that Knight has her work cut out for her, trying to find Abigail before it’s too late and getting to the bottom of what everyone is hiding.  

The clever style of writing allowed the reader to experience a roller coaster of emotion along with Jennifer Knight, the shock of some discoveries did have me looking up from my book in absolutely amazement.  The characters are great, something about the parents of the girls seemed to niggle at me, their reactions to their daughter being missing seemed unnatural – this subtle way of dropping little snippets of information was both helpful and a complete red herring in some cases, meaning the reader has their work cut out for them if they want to try and second guess Caroline Mitchell.
An utterly captivating read, dark and twisted enough to secure Caroline Mitchell the title of one of my favourite authors.  This is an impressive crime fiction series with a touch of something unearthly, very enjoyable and absolutely gripping!    
You can buy a copy of The Silent Twin here

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Burned and Broken

Author: Mark Hardie
Published:23 June 2016
Reviewed: 30 July 2016 
4 out of 5 Stars
Copy supplied by Little, Brown Book Group / Sphere in return for an honest review
Description:

An enigmatic policeman – currently the subject of an internal investigation – is found burned to death in his car on the Southend sea front.

A vulnerable young woman, fresh out of the care system, is trying to discover the truth behind the sudden death of her best friend.

As DS Frank Pearson and DC Catherine Russell from the Essex Police Major Investigation Team are brought in to solve the mystery that surrounds their colleague’s death, they’re under intense pressure to crack the case without damaging the force’s reputation. 

When a dramatic turn of events casts a whole new light on both cases, the way forward is far from clear. Were the victims connected in some way? And just how much should Pearson and Russell reveal to their bosses as they begin to unearth some dark secrets that the force would rather keep buried?

My Thoughts & Review:

The book opens with the horrific scene of DI Sean Carragher burning to death  in his car.  The discovery of his unrecognisable body in the burnt out vehicle sparks an investigation by DS Frank Pearson and the Essex Police Major Investigation Team.  As far as openings go, this is a pretty powerful one, it immediately grabs the reader’s attention.

The narrative jumps back four days, the author recounts the events leading up to the investigation of DI Carragher’s death.  During these four days the reader is introduced to Donna Freeman, a sixteen year old in her first year out of care.  Donna is convinced that her friend Alicia has been murdered and continuously tries to get someone to listen to her that it was not an accident.  We also discover that DI Carragher was being investigated by Professional Standards for suspected corruption, witness intimidation and assault to name but a few, and that there are no shortage of suspects connected with his death.

In amongst the sprawling investigation, DS Frank Pearson has his own troubles, in poor health and undergoing tests for suspected pancreatic cancer and estranged from his wife.  DC Catherine (Cat) Russell finds the reach of the Professional Standards investigation into her former partner (DI Carragher) is coming too close to home, falling under suspicion by association, she desperately wants to protect Sean Carragher, but remaining loyal will mean telling lies for him.  
The death of one of their own sees the Police throwing resources at this case to solve it quickly, but that also means there are many pair of eyes watching the investigation, ones that will not approve of the discoveries made by Pearson and Russell.  

This is a very cleverly written thriller, with layer upon layer of detail. The use of different perspectives for narration gives the reader a good insight into the Police investigation as well as the life of Donna in care.  
The novel is split into three distinct parts, and this is a very effective technique for setting out the story, indeed this would also make this an idea book to transfer to screen. 
Well paced plot, with brilliant little details added for that extra something special.  The characters are well crafted, realistic and credible.  The location used is a welcome change from the normal big cities, so thank you Mr Hardie, you’ve broken away from the “norm” and given the reader what we’ve been screaming out for.   

A very impressive début novel and one I would have no hesitation to recommend.

You can buy a copy of Burned and Broken here.

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The Eyes of The Accused 

Author: Mark Tilbury
Published: 15 April 2016
Reviewed: 29 July 2016
4.5 out of 5 Stars
I received a copy of this book from Booklover Catlady Publicity in return for a fair and honest review

 

Description:
 
The second in The Ben Whittle Investigation series of psychological thrillers with occasional flashes of dark humour. Best enjoyed after reading The Revelation Room.

Fresh from the horrors of the Revelation Room, private investigators Ben and Maddie are plunged into a disturbing world of terror as they search for missing pregnant girl, Hannah Heath. Drawn to Frank Crowley, an original suspect in Hannah’s disappearance, Maddie is about to learn the true meaning of evil. As she gets close to Crowley, in an effort to get him to open up, she soon learns all is not what it seems. Crowley is just a small part of something unimaginable. Something so terrible and deranged, it defies reason. After Maddie disappears, Ben is left in a desperate race against time to find her and uncover the truth.

My Thoughts & Review:
This is the second book in the Ben Whittle series, and I would thoroughly recommend checking out the first book The Revelation Room.  However, this book can be read as a standalone, there are details that link back to the first book but nothing that would impact on this story and leave you feeling like you’ve missed something.
Ben Whittle and Maddie White are Private Investigators working for Ben’s father who owns the Private Investigation company.  Having been hired to find a missing woman named Hannah, who happens to be pregnant and due to give birth soon they embark upon an investigation that will prove to be dangerous for all involved, and when Maddie goes missing Ben knows he must do everything he can to find both women before it’s too late. 
From the very first chapter the reader is hooked, the intensity of the terror and writing style really grab your attention and ensure you are sucked in for the duration of the story.  The narration from Hannah is exceptionally well written, dark and intense, her desperation really comes through, it’s hard not to feel some horror at how she’s been kept.  
The storyline well paced, I felt that it kept my attention throughout, combined with fantastic characters I really struggled to put this one down at bedtime!  The dark humour interjected into this was a thing of greatness, Mark Tilbury shows a brilliant sense of humour through his writing, it adds an extra something to his characters and really brings them alive.
I will definitely be looking out for more from this author, his writing style really appeals to me, the characters are great and I cannot wait to see where he takes them next.
Many thanks to Booklover Catlady Publicity for this cracking read!
You can buy a copy of Eyes of the Accused here 

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Author: A.L. Bird
Published: 4 April 2016
Reviewed: 29 July 2016
4 out of 5 Stars
 Copy supplied by Carina UK in return for an honest review

Description:

The greatest bond. The darkest betrayal.

Susan wakes up alone in a room she doesn’t recognise, with no memory of how she got there. She only knows that she is trapped, and her daughter is missing.

The relief that engulfs her when she hears her daughter’s voice through the wall is quickly replaced by fear, knowing that whoever has imprisoned her has her daughter, too.

Devising a plan to keep her daughter safe, Susan begins to get closer to her unknown captor. And suddenly, she realises that she has met him before. 

My Thoughts & Review:

Thrown straight into the confusion felt by one of the main characters Susan, the reader is catapulted into the action.  Susan wakes up in a strange room, in a strange house and instantly I was hooked.  Her fear and confusion were palpable, her desperation to find out where her daughter was and if she was ok was almost painful to read.  Bird conveys Susan’s emotions and fears brilliantly, the reader can feel the tension and experiences the turmoil Susan endures.

Unfortunately, the plot and the gripping twists make this a very difficult review to write, it is extremely hard not to give any little clues away.  This is quite a dark story, very cleverly written and twisted beyond what you could imagine.  It’s the sort of story that keeps the reader guessing what will happen next, and once all the clues are revealed you will be in disbelief at what you have just read.

It’s the sort of book that stays with you once you’ve finished it, something about it made me uncomfortable reading it, so much so that my mind would wander back to the scenarios from the book and questioned what would I do in that position.  Something about Bird’s writing really gripped me, her plotting was flawless, the characters were fascinating – narration from not only Susan but also her captor gave a chilling but fascinating insight.  I will admit that this book felt a little too tense at times, there was a point I put it down as it felt claustrophobic, but this just shows the skill in the writing.  It is incredibly powerful when an author can reach the reader through the pages of their book to share the experiences of the characters and the emotions. 

You can buy a copy of The Good Mother here. 

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