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Description:

As fourteen-year-old Ella begins her first day at work she steps into a world of silks, seams, scissors, pins, hems and trimmings. She is a dressmaker, but this is no ordinary sewing workshop. Hers are no ordinary clients.

Ella has joined the seamstresses of Birkenau-Auschwitz, as readers may recognise it. Every dress she makes could mean the difference between life and death. And this place is all about survival.

Ella seeks refuge from this reality, and from haunting memories, in her work and in the world of fashion and fabrics. She is faced with painful decisions about how far she is prepared to go to survive. Is her love of clothes and creativity nothing more than collaboration with her captors, or is it a means of staying alive? Will she fight for herself alone, or will she trust the importance of an ever-deepening friendship with Rose?

One thing weaves through the colours of couture gowns and camp mud – a red ribbon, given to Ella as a symbol of hope.

 

My Thoughts & Review:

The moment I read the description of this book I knew I had to find out more and was delighted to be offered a review copy to read.  I have a great interest in book set during WWII, the courage and strength shown by the characters is something that I find moving and their stories are incredibly moving.

In this we meet Ella, taken from her family as she went about her day and thrown into Auschwitz work camp.  From here she stops being Ella, the Nazis strip her of her worldly goods including her treasured green sweater.  She is given a number, black and white striped clothing and has to find a bunk in an over crowded hut.  But despite this, she is determined.  Determined to do what it takes to survive, determined not let the Nazis win and crush her spirit.  At just fourteen years old she wins her first job as a seamstress in the camp’s sewing hut.  I say win because she has to prove her worth against another hopeful contender, and in places like the work camps it was a case of survival of the fittest. 

Through some incredibly detailed narrative, readers are almost able to feel the silks that Ella sews, can see the delicate embroidery done on the garments, but most powerful of all is the descriptions of the fear felt by Ella and her fellow inmates.
Whilst Ella is a strong character, she contrasts well with her new friend Rose.  Rose is gentle, and kind and has an imagination that makes your heart swell.  The stories that Rose makes up during their time in the camp are their means of distraction and a way to help them survive the atrocities they endure.  Watching Ella trying to push Rose to be less kind and more selfish was hard, but for the sake of her safety, Rose had to toughen up.

There were many instances whilst reading this that I paused, my heart breaking at what I was reading, like most takes set during this time period, they are not for the feint hearted.  There is a harsh reality that has to be faced, and whilst this is a fictional tale there are elements of truth to it and from reading other books it’s quite easy to imagine events playing out as they did in this book.  The rawness of the emotions I felt reading this are a credit to Lucy Adlington, her writing is superb and truly left me feeling so caught up in the story of Ella.

You can buy a copy of The Red Ribbon via:

Amazon UK
Wordery
Book Depository

 

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** My thanks to the wonderful Karen Sullivan at Orenda Books and Anne Cater for my copy of this book and for inviting me to be part of the blog tour **

 

Description:

Two days before Christmas, a young woman is found dead beneath the cliffs of the deserted village of Kálfshamarvík. Did she jump, or did something more sinister take place beneath the lighthouse and the abandoned old house on the remote rocky outcrop? With winter closing in and the snow falling relentlessly, Ari Thór Arason discovers that the victim’s mother and young sister also lost their lives in this same spot, twenty-five years earlier. As the dark history and its secrets of the village are unveiled, and the death toll begins to rise, the Siglufjordur detectives must race against the clock to find the killer, before another tragedy takes place. Dark, chilling and complex, Whiteout is a haunting, atmospheric and stunningly plotted thriller from one of Iceland’s bestselling crime writers.

My Thoughts & Review:

For fans of Ragnar Jónasson’s Dark Iceland series a huge sigh of relief can be breathed, the next instalment has landed!

Whiteout sees readers reunited with Ari Thór who is investigating the case of a young woman found dead at the bottom of the cliffs in Kálfshamarvík, a deserted village.  He and Tómas have their work cut out for them with a tight time frame to solve this one, but when they discover that the young woman’s mother and young sister died at the same spot some years ago the investigation becomes as dark and chilling as an Icelandic winter.
The plot also has a wonderful strand relating to the personal lives of Ari, Tómas and Ari’s girlfriend Kristen.  Kristen is heavily pregnant and ends up agreeing to join Ari and Tómas on their trip to Kálfshamarvík, using the time to research her family history.

If you are new to the Dark Island series, I would thoroughly recommend going back and reading the books in order, this will build up a better picture of Ari Thór and give you a wonderful grounding of the skill of Ragnar Jónasson.  He incorporates the eeriness of the setting perfectly into the plot of his novels leaving a reader feeling chilled and wrapped up in the darkness.  I love the way that this feels more like an old fashioned investigation story, relying on intuition and investigative techniques, and it feels like an exercise in mental capabilities trying to puzzle the mystery together with Ari.

There is so much more to this novel than I first expected and I truly am glad.  The character development was superb, it was good to see more about the personalities and  felt that I learned more about Ari and Kristen in Whiteout.  The other characters in this were equally interesting in their own way, some that readers can empathise with and feel invested in, but equally there were ones that you could not help but loathe.

As always, the wonderful scenery that is described in Ragnar’s books really sets the scene and tone for the novel.  I’ve never been to Iceland, and only ever googled images but from what I’ve read in the series it feels like I’ve trudged through the snow, battled biting winds and been lost in the dark of Iceland on several occasions.  The imagery that the writing conjures is so powerful and intense.  The narrative holds your attention perfectly and draws you in slowly making this a superb read!

A thank you to Quentin Bates for this wonderful translation, it’s always a joy when you see him listed as the translator of a book as you know that he will have ensured that the English version of a book will read as though it were the original.

 

You can buy a copy of Whiteout via:

Orenda Books eBookstore
Amazon UK
Wordery
Book Depository

 

About the Author

Ragnar_Photo_TwoRagnar Jónasson is author of the international bestselling Dark Iceland series. His debut Snowblind went to number one in the kindle charts shortly after publication, and Nightblind, Blackout and Rupture soon followed suit, hitting the number one spot in five countries, and the series being sold in 18 countries and for TV. Ragnar was born in Reykjavik, Iceland, where he continues to work as a lawyer. From the age of 17, Ragnar translated 14 Agatha Christie novels into Icelandic. He has appeared on festival panels worldwide, and lives in Reykjavik with his wife and young daughters.

Follow Ragnar on Twitter and his website.

Follow the blog tour:

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I am so excited to be part of the blog tour for The Good Samaritan by John Marrs, not only because I’ve enjoyed a lot of his books, but because I am joining some of the best book reviewers and bloggers on this tour, especially my tour buddy Sharon Bairden who blogs over at Chapterinmylife she’s also my go to person when I need recommendations for Scottish Crime Fiction – seriously, head over there and check out her blog if you’ve not done so already…but perhaps after you’ve read my review.

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** My thanks to Tracy Fenton and Thomas & Mercer for my copy of this and for inviting me to be part of the blog tour **

 

Description:

She’s a friendly voice on the phone. But can you trust her?

The people who call End of the Line need hope. They need reassurance that life is worth living. But some are unlucky enough to get through to Laura. Laura doesn’t want them to hope. She wants them to die.

Laura hasn’t had it easy: she’s survived sickness and a difficult marriage only to find herself heading for forty, unsettled and angry. She doesn’t love talking to people worse off than she is. She craves it.

But now someone’s on to her—Ryan, whose world falls apart when his pregnant wife ends her life, hand in hand with a stranger. Who was this man, and why did they choose to die together?

The sinister truth is within Ryan’s grasp, but he has no idea of the desperate lengths Laura will go to…

Because the best thing about being a Good Samaritan is that you can get away with murder.

My Thoughts & Review:

After I read and enjoyed The One by John Marrs earlier this year I was delighted to hear that he had written another book and was ecstatic to be offered an early copy to read for the blog tour (the perks of being a complete book nerd!).
I do love the creeping unease that builds throughout John’s books, there’s a danger that lurks just out of sight in the narrative that you can’t quite put your finger on, but you know that it’s coming and you know that it will catch you completely unawares but you can’t help but devour the book waiting for it to jump out at you.

In The Good Samaritan we meet Laura who is the epitome of the perfect character written by John Marrs, you can’t quite work her out.  To others, she seems perfect.  She’s caring, helpful, bakes cakes to bring into her co-workers, offers to sew clothing that’s lost a button or needs hemming, and on top of all of this, she has survived cancer so she stands out as someone who is noticeable.  But underneath it all, there’s something sinister about her, she gets a kick out of helping people end their lives and working in  a call centre where suicidal people call is the perfect setting for her to cherry pick her victims.

With some impressive plotting, readers are taken on a journey through Laura’s twisted and fiendishly devious mind as she recounts moments from her past that shock and alarm at times, she’s tortured by her earlier life and wants to escape the memories by helping others who truly want to die.  And I admit, I did feel incredibly saddened for her at times, but like a yo-yo my sympathies lessened when I learned more about her, she seemed ruthless and cruel, before sneakily John Marrs changed tact and had me feeling empathy towards her again.  This is offset perfectly with the character of Ryan.  Where Laura evokes horror and shock, Ryan elicits emotions of sadness, pity and sympathy, but as the plot moves on at a rate of knots the emotions switch around as each of the lead characters assume the position of power.

The way that the story hooks readers in is absolutely key, and for those out there who love an unreliable narrator then you’re in for a treat with The Good Samaritan.  There are moments where you think you can preempt where the plot is heading only for John Marrs to swiftly pull the carpet from underneath you and leave you reeling.  The plot twists are clever and downright brilliant in places.
This is the sort of book that you can’t read whilst cooking supper or you may well end up cremating it all, or end up reading into the wee hours of the morning because you’ve been so wrapped in what happens.  And if you do manage to put the book down, you may well find that it plays out in your head, taunting you to get back to reading, making you wonder what might happen next, or make you ask what you might do in that situation.

A gripping thriller that really gets into your head!

You can buy a copy of The Good Samaritan via:

Amazon UK
Wordery
Book Depository

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** My thanks to the folks at Trapeze and NetGalley for my copy of this brilliantly laugh out loud book **

 

Description:

Part autobiography, part self help, part confession, part celebration of being a common-or-garden woman, part collection of synonyms for nunny, Sarah Millican’s debut book delves into her super normal life with daft stories, funny tales and proper advice on how to get past life’s blips – like being good at school but not good at friends, the excitement of IBS and how to blossom post divorce.

If you’ve ever worn glasses at the age of six, worn an off-the-shoulder gown with no confidence, been contacted by an old school bully, lived in your childhood bedroom in your thirties, been gloriously dumped in a Frankie and Benny’s, cried so much you felt great, been for a romantic walk with a dog, worn leggings two days in a row even though they smelt of wee from a distance, then this is YOUR BOOK. If you haven’t done those things but wish you had, THIS IS YOUR BOOK. If you just want to laugh on a train/sofa/toilet or under your desk at work, THIS IS YOUR BOOK.

 

My Thoughts & Review:

How to be Champion is a book that I wish had been written earlier, it’s sort of like a manual for life as a young un, and reminds us that bullies don’t always win.
If you’ve ever seen Sarah Millican live then this book reads as though she were there on the sofa with you recounting the tales of her past.  You can hear her voice as she describes how vital it was to find out if you could wear glasses to disco dance, or how big her admiration is of her parents.  Don’t get me wrong, it’s not all sunshine in the garden, she does tell the reader about how rubbish life could be too, her warts and all frankness is refreshing and her sparkling wit shines though in her writing.

I found I was reading this aloud in sections to my husband and laughing so hard that I had tears rolling down my face, some sections of this are outrageously hilarious and this book proved to be just the “pick me up” that I needed after a stressful week.  I applaud her for her stance on body image, self-esteem, and mental health.  Millican has become an unofficial spokesperson for our generation and does so with great effect.  In at least two of her stage shows she has made a very clear point of mentioning that she has accepted her body image and no longer cares what others think (paraphrasing here), she is who she is and is happy with that and it’s wonderful to see, there so many of us who can empathise with the sentiments and indeed she almost gives you the confidence to say “sod it, this is me, like it or bugger off”.  We’ve all been there, in a changing room trying on clothes that don’t fit and ended up buying a bag instead. 

Her brand of humour is stuffed into this book in spades and I for one love it.  As I mentioned above, it really does read as though you’re sharing a cuppa and a cake with Sarah, it feels like she’s telling her tales directly to you and only you despite the fact there are thousands of copies of this book out there in the hands of lucky readers.

This is a book that I will treasure, and probably keep to pass on to my daughter once she’s old enough.  A book that I wish I’d had in my teens to let me know that there  are some horrible people who will be bullies, there will be times when you wish the ground would swallow you up because of embarrassment but ultimately it’s ok, you can still be champion at the end of it all.

An uplifting and heart gladdening read that made me laugh, nod along in agreement and left me feeling bloody champion about it all!

You can buy a copy of How to be Champion via:

Amazon UK
Wordery
Book Depository

 

 

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** My thanks to the wonderful Karen Sullivan at Orenda Books and Anne Cater for my copy of this book and for inviting me to be part of the blog tour **

 

Description:

Crime spreads across the globe in this new collection of short stories from the Crime Writer’s Association, as a conspiracy of prominent crime authors take you on a world mystery tour.

Highlights of the trip include a treacherous cruise to French Polynesia, a horrifying trek in South Africa, a murderous train-ride across Ukraine and a vengeful killing in Mumbai. But back home in the UK, life isn’t so easy either. Dead bodies turn up on the backstreets of Glasgow, crime writers turn words into deeds at literary events, and Lady Luck seems to guide the fate of a Twickenham hood.

Showcasing the range, breadth and vitality of the contemporary crime-fiction genre, these twenty-eight chilling and unputdownable stories will take you on a trip you’ll never forget.

Contributions from:
Ann Cleeves, C.L. Taylor, Susi Holliday, Martin Edwards, Anna Mazzola, Carol Anne Davis, Cath Staincliffe, Chris Simms, Christine Poulson, Ed James, Gordon Brown, J.M. Hewitt, Judith Cutler, Julia Crouch, Kate Ellis, Kate Rhodes, Martine Bailey, Michael Stanley, Maxim Jakubowski, Paul Charles, Paul Gitsham, Peter Lovesey, Ragnar Jónasson, Sarah Rayne, Shawn Reilly Simmons, Vaseem Khan, William Ryan and William Burton McCormick

 

My Thoughts & Review:

For those of you who read this blog on a regular basis (you are much appreciated and I cannot thank you enough for stopping by), you will notice that I review the odd short story here and there, but never crimes ones.  The reason for this is that I like my crime reads to be meatier, to be more fleshed out and like to get carried away with the story.  But I decided it was time to step out of my comfort zone and see what I was missing out on.  Reading through the list of contributing authors for this anthology, it’s like a who’s who of the brilliant and best out there and with a few names that I am a huge fan of, how could Orenda Books do me wrong?

Like many readers, when I first picked this book up I instantly wondered how this would be best read…should I just start with the first tale by Ann Cleaves and work my way through?  Should I pick out stories that jumped out immediately and read them first?  Decisions, decisions…..
In the end, I went for the option of picking my favourite authors and honing in on their pieces first.  The first tale that I read was by William Ryan, who wrote one of my favourite novels The Constant Soldier, the piece that he has written is very different from his usual style of writing and I LOVED IT!  There’s so much detail and tension packed into a few pages, the story crackles and fizzes with excitement, it oozes suspense and had me desperate to see it expanded into a full length novel to find out more about the characters, especially Angela!
Fans of Anna Mazzola are in for a real treat, she manages to pack in some of the most tense and foreboding writing into just a few pages that will leave readers gasping.  From there I quickly raced to find the piece written by Ragnar Jónasson and was not disappointed.  Each and every one of the stories in this book is excellent, all different and all utterly fantastic!  Like a child in a sweetshop, I jumped from one spot to another, deciding to read stories as they jumped out to me, and it was the perfect book to pick up in between those pesky housework chores.  Do an load of ironing, reward yourself with a cuppa and a story or two….worked for me!

Would I recommend this book?  Absolutely, in a heartbeat!  If there are authors that you’re not sure about whether you might like their style of writing then this is a great book for you.  I admit that previous to this, I had not read anything by one or two of the authors listed (their books are in my ever growing “to be read” pile, but other things keep sneaking in front of them), so it was nice to get a feel for their writing and it has meant that there’s a book snuck it’s way closer to the top as I really enjoyed what I found.  I won’t mention names (certain bloggers will chastise me for my glaring omission in crime fiction).

In short, this is a cornucopia of talented writers, writing some of their best ideas and sharing them with us very lucky readers!

 

You can buy a copy of CWA Anthology of Short Stories via:

Amazon UK
Wordery
Book Depository
Blackwell’s

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Hello and welcome along to The Quiet Knitter! It’s Friday, and that can only mean one thing (well for here anyway!), it’s time for another post to “Celebrate Indie Publishing”.
This week I am delighted to bring you a book from No Exit Press and I thoroughly recommend checking them out both as they have some cracking books to offer! Today’s book in the spotlight is Hunting the Hangman by Howard Linskey and he’s kindly taken some time out to face a grilling for the author feature.


Book Feature:

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TWO MEN. . . ONE MISSION. . . TO KILL THE MAN WITH THE IRON HEART

Bestselling author Howard Linskey’s fifteen year fascination with the assassination attempt on Reinhard Heydrich, the architect of the holocaust, has produced a meticulously researched, historically accurate thriller with a plot that echoes The Day of the Jackal and The Eagle has Landed.

2017 marks the 75th anniversary of the attack on a man so evil even fellow SS officers referred to him as the ‘Blond Beast’. In Prague he was known as the Hangman. Hitler, who called him ‘The Man with the Iron Heart’, considered Heydrich to be his heir, and entrusted him with the implementation of the ‘Final Solution’ to the Jewish question: the systematic murder of eleven million people.

In 1942 two men were trained by the British SOE to parachute back into their native Czech territory to kill the man ruling their homeland. Jan Kubis and Josef Gabcik risked everything for their country. Their attempt on Reinhard Heydrich’s life was one of the single most dramatic events of the Second World War, with horrific consequences for thousands of innocent people.

Hunting the Hangman is a tale of courage, resilience and betrayal with a devastating finale. Based on true events, the story reads like a classic World War Two thriller and is the subject of two big-budget Hollywood films that coincide with the anniversary of Operation Anthropoid.

 

My Thoughts & Review:

Reinhard Heydrich was a figure that loomed largely during WWII, tales of his most evil deeds and thoughts about those he deemed of a lesser standing than himself or members of the Nazi party have been well documented over the years.  His ruthless and evil ways have marked him as one of the most dangerous men in The Third Reich, his desires driven by greed and obstinance.

Howard Linskey has researched his novel well, and in doing so has ensured that he can present a novel that does not shy away from the atrocities and harrowing moments in history, instead it states them in a very matter of fact fashion.
Whilst this is a fictionalised account of Operation Anthropoid, it is still a very interesting piece of work with some of the best characterisation I’ve ever read.  The portrayal of each of the major characters feels incredibly detailed, the way that Heydrich comes across on the pages is downright terrifying.  Linskey did well writing such a in depth and rounded portrayal of Heydrich, showing the many faces that this man possessed.  The way that the reader is privy to his thoughts, hears of his love of his father’s music, sees him as a father jars somewhat with the reality that he was one of “the main architects of the Holocaust”.

The two characters who stole my heart were Jan Kubiš and Jozef Gabčík, from the moment they first appeared they had my full attention.  Watching them come alive through Linskey’s writing was wonderful to watch, but equally the more they came alive for me the more connected to them I felt, the more invested in them I became and in turn the more heartbroken I would become as I read on, aware at what fate awaited them with the mission they’d been tasked with.  It’s rare that I will begin to hope that an author has used artistic license in a book such as this, hoping that they will change the outcome so that characters I’ve become attached to won’t face the outcome that I know is reality, and here I did hope that could be the case.

Such an evocative read, and one that is so intensely powerful.  The writing is absolutely superb and so atmospheric, the sense of foreboding and poignancy that builds throughout is almost breathtaking.  I cannot recommend it highly enough!

 

You can buy a copy of Hunting the Hangman via:

Amazon UK
Wordery
Book Depository


 

Author Feature:

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Howard Linskey is the author of three novels in the David Blake crime series published by No Exit Press, The Drop, The Damage and The Dead. Harry Potter producer, David Barron optioned a TV adaptation of The Drop, which was voted one of the Top Five Thrillers of the Year by The TimesThe Damage was voted one of The Times‘ Top Summer Reads. He is also the author of No Name Lane, Behind Dead Eyes and The Search, the first three books in a crime series set in the north east of England featuring journalists Tom Carney & Helen Norton, published by Penguin. His latest book, Hunting the Hangman, is a historical thriller about the assassination of Reinhard Heydrich in Prague during WW2.

Originally from Ferryhill in County Durham, he now lives in Hertfordshire with his wife Alison and daughter Erin.

 

What’s your most favourite thing about being an author?

There are so many good things about being an author. I am my own boss to an extent and have escaped the drudge of the commute, the office politics, the need to ever wear a suit again, apart from at weddings and funerals and the insidious pressure that comes with a conventional job. I’m doing what I love and get to see a book with my name and a Penguin logo on it when I am finished, which is a lovely feeling. I get some great feedback from readers too. The very best thing though is that I am there every day when my daughter comes home from school, so I get to spend more time with her than most dads and you cannot put a price on that.

What’s your least favourite thing about being an author?

The fretting. There is quite a lot of that. For example; is this book I am writing any good or is it the biggest pile of excrement ever dreamed up by any author? Then there is; will anyone stock this book, closely followed by will anyone buy the blooming thing if they do and then will they actually like it? Somehow it always seems to work out all right in the end but I have come to realise the fretting will never quite stop no matter how much progress I make. I’ve had seven books published now and it never seems to get any easier on the fretting front.

If you could have written any book what would it be and why?

I find it hard to pick my all-time top-ten books, let alone single just one out, but if I absolutely have to, I will go for ‘Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy’ by John Le Carre, which is a beautifully written novel about betrayal that also works as a mystery and a whodunnit, all wrapped up in a cold war spy story. There’s some wonderful dialogue and a wholly satisfying conclusion too. At his best, Le Carre is a marvellous author.

How do you spend your time when you’re not wrapped up plotting your next book?

Procrastinating mostly. Authors are world champion procrastinators. ‘Why put off tomorrow what we can put off today, tomorrow and most of next week’ should be our motto. Every day starts with such good intentions on the writing front but by the time I have read The Times, replied to emails, gone on Facebook and twitter, read the latest horrifying news about Donald Trump’s behaviour and checked to see if Newcastle United have finally signed a player, I have often lost hours. I then panic and have an intense burst of writing, powered by guilt. Somehow it’s quite effective and it works for me. I’ve come to realise too that even when an author is out walking the dog, driving or having a shower they are never quite off-duty and those are the moments when ideas usually come and begin to germinate. That’s my excuse anyway.

Do you have a set routine for writing? Rituals you have to observe? I.e. specific pen, silence, day or night etc.

One of the things I like about being an author is the flexibility to do things when I am in the mood to do them and not on a nine-to-five basis, so as long as I have a few hours each day and the opportunity to write a 1,000 to 1,500 words, I don’t really mind when and where this is. Sometimes I work at home, either in my office or somewhere comfy with the lap top on my knee but, if I get stir crazy and need people around me, I like to pop out and work at the local library or in a café. I even do my edits in the pub with a pint of bitter close at hand. That’s definitely one of the perks of being a writer unfortunately the beer is not tax-deductable.

 

A huge thank you to Howard for taking part and for sharing some more about himself, it’s always nice to get to know the person behind a book.  And i have to agree about Le Carre, a genius when it comes to writing and one author who’s books I cannot live without.
If you would like to know more about Howard and his books, check out the following link:

Website: http://www.howardlinskey.co.uk/

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Murder-Game-Kindle

** My thanks to the wonderful folks at Bookouture (aka Kim & Noelle)  for my copy of Murder Game and for inviting me to be part of the blog tour **

 

Description:

A serial killer is playing a terrifying game of life or death with his victims. After he captures them, a countdown begins. He marks the time by sending clues to the whereabouts of the women he has taken in three disturbing images: alive, tortured, dead. 

In a race against the clock, East London Detective Ruby Preston must play the twisted killer’s terrifying murder game and decipher the clues before more women die… 

But this isn’t the first time the police have seen such a sickening crime. The notorious Lonely Hearts Killer, Mason Gatley, was put behind bars ten years ago for murdering six women in exactly the same chilling way. Desperate for more information, Ruby persuades her boyfriend, Nathan Crosby, to use his criminal connections to set up a dangerous meeting. Because to catch this killer, she needs to think like one… 

But the closer Ruby grows to the dark and charming Mason Gatley, the more worried her team become. Is Mason really helping her catch the killer? Or is he lining Ruby up to be his next victim?

Fans of Angela Marsons, Rachel Abbott and Peter James will be hooked by this dark and utterly disturbing thriller, packed with twists until the final page.

My Thoughts & Review:

Fianlly, the third book in the Detective Ruby Preston series, oh how I’ve waited to get my hands on this book!!  I’ve been a fan of this series since book one, Death Note but have been a fan of Caroline Mitchell’s writing for some time now.

The plot of this book is brilliant, and absolutely gripping.  I loved that Ruby is back in a relationship with Nathan Crosby, the danger and the clandestine air to their pairing just makes this all the more exciting!

Ruby Preston finds herself up against a ruthless killer, one who seems to be playing a deadly game and worst of all paying homage to a serial killer who is now behind bars for the crimes he committed.  The copycat killer is taunting the police, leaving pictures as clues for them to solve, and pitting them against the clock before a second victim is taken.  If this killer isn’t enough to chill readers to the core, then the original killer definitely will.  Ruby goes to him in prison, hoping that he might be able to answer some of her questions, but he seems to have his own agenda which adds a wonderfully gripping edge to the plot.

Anytime I’ve seen Caroline Mitchell interviewed on a blog or appearing on social media she comes across as such a lovely and friendly person, so kind and generally the sort of person you could chat to over a cuppa (and cake!), but somehow she manages to create characters who are the antithesis if of herself.  The killers in Murder Game are so disturbing, making this the perfect read for Halloween season.  I did find there were a couple of times I squirmed as I read, that old “someone walking over your grave” sensation kicked in a couple of times but that wasn’t enough to drag me away from this book!  Absolutely stunned when the final reveal came, hat tip to Caroline Mitchell there, even with the number of psychological thrillers I’ve read I didn’t see the killer’s identity coming at all!

If you’ve not read any of Caroline Mitchell’s books I would seriously recommend them, and urge you to pick up the Ruby Preston series!

You can buy a copy of Murder Game via:

Amazon UK 🇬🇧: http://amzn.to/2v1l8v5

Amazon US 🇺🇸: http://amzn.to/2umrDqp

 

Don’t forget to check out the other blogs taking part in the BlogBlitz for Murder Game:

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(Mostly) Fiction reviews with a crime slant

Clues and Reviews

A Blog For Book Lovers by A Book Lover!

Secret Library Blog

Books, Books, Books

the orang-utan librarian

welcome to the virtual library

TheCraftyLass

TheCraftyLass Goes Postal : sharing my love of all things bookish, crafty, geeky, cooking & snail mail

Cheryl M-M's Book Blog

What can I say? I just love books. Indie/self/trad published...I don't give two monkeys. My reviews are always my subjective and honest opinion. Nothing more and nothing less.

IFINDOUBTREAD

Don't Get Left On The Shelf

mybookishblogspot

Just books, more books and some other stuff too

booksaremycwtches

Reading takes me to other worlds. Other times and other places.

Sarah's Vignettes

Ramblings about books and life

bookboodle

Books & Bakes

Bits about Books - Caroline Vincent

BOOK REVIEWS & BLOGGING | AUTHOR PA & PUBLICITY

Chat About Books

Book reviews, author interviews, blog tours..... since October 2015