Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘book review’ Category

I’m sneaking in to share a review of a book that I read last year and utterly loved, it’s had a makeover and is being rebranded, relaunched and I am honoured to be part of the buzz of this book!  And now, back into hibernation ……

Cover

 

Description:

When will you discover The Otherside?

There is more to the shadows than just darkness

The Otherside is located at the fringes of our world, hiding in plain sight and existing within our shadows. Shielded from humanity, the Otherside is watched over by the BTCO, a highly secret government agency, whose members all possess ‘The Knack’, a genetic anomaly that allows them to see this other world.

Franklyn ‘Bermuda’ Jones is the BTCO’s finest agent, the only human to have passed to the Otherside and returned. Gifted with the ability to physically interact with both worlds, Bermuda reluctantly stands between both worlds, pining for the life he had to leave behind and the daughter he can no longer see. Teamed with Argyle, an enigmatic Otherside warrior, Bermuda is assigned the case of a missing woman who has vanished under mysterious circumstances.

As Bermuda delves further into the disappearance, he uncovers a threat that could destroy the truce between two worlds…and finds himself in a race against time to safeguard humanity’s very existence.

Discover a new world in this fast-paced urban fantasy packed with thrills, action and the odd one liner.

My Thoughts & Review:

Science Fiction is not a genre I tend to read very often, the speculative nature of the genre jars with my analytically driven mind and I find that I don’t enjoy these books as much.  That being said, when I heard about Robert Enright’s Doorways I was intrigued enough to give it a try, the idea that there was a thriller/mystery woven into the Sci-Fi plot was enough to tempt me into giving it a go.

The protagonist Franklyn “Bermuda” Jones is an interesting character, one that possesses a gift (more a curse in his opinion) that means he can interact with “Others”, lifeforms from another existence.  Unfortunately for Bermuda, he is one of the few who can so more often than not he looks mad, talking to himself.  In actual fact he is usually speaking to Argyle, his partner, his sidekick, his “Other”.  The concept of the detective speaking to an “unseen” entity reminded me somewhat of a tv series I enjoyed as a youngster Randall & Hopkirk (deceased), the detective working in tandem with his unseen partner who was instrumental in his solving cases with a wonderful comedic element.
The dynamic of Bermuda and Argyle is well written, for all intents and purposes you could be reading their dialogue and seeing two human detectives in an office or other setting, the sarcastic edge to their exchanges is both humorous and entertaining.  But there also seems to be a genuine bond between these two characters, coupled with a strong element of care.

Essentially a story about good versus evil, the fight between the two is surely a messy one.  Vividly described fight scenes play out across the pages, damage done to buildings, Bermuda and Others with some serious weaponry and incredible brute force.  The violence in these scenes is not so graphic that it will put readers off and if anything the fluidity of the descriptions means that the reader can watch the scenes play out in their mind clearly.

The concept of “The Otherside” was interesting, and the characters were fascinating but there were a few wee bits that I found harder to get onboard with, however it’s probably more a personal thing given that I have a penchant for reading thrillers and real crime genres – my mind wants to make sense of things and likes details to be as real to life as possible.  This does not detract from a great book however, and I do think that should Robert Enright want to expand his Bermuda Jones story to a series of books he would do so with great ease.  His writing is great, there is intelligence and skill in the writing, a great groundwork in place to lead into another novel and best of all a character (well two if you count Argyle) that readers are invested in.  I do hope there are more books to come, I may not be fully converted to being a fan of Sci-Fi, but I am definitely a fan of Enright’s writing!

You can buy a copy of Doorways via Amazon UK. 

About the Author:

Author Photo

Born and raised in North West London and now residing in Hertfordshire, Robert Enright has been writing for over 10 years. His debut novel – ONE BY ONE – was self published on Amazon in March 2015, receiving critical acclaim and was nominated for Books Go Social Book of the Year 2015. The violent, revenge thriller gave Rob a path into crime fiction, but the constantly embraced geek within him went a different way. 2016 will see the release of DOORWAYS – published by Urbane Publications – the first in the Bermuda Jones series, a dark sci-fi about an agency dealing with the threat of a parallel world. He can’t wait to write the whole series – if he can put down his Xbox controller or his Nerf Guns!

For more information about Rob and his upcoming books, feel free to check him out on social media:

Twitter – @REnright_Author
Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/robenrightauthor

 

Quote and Proce

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

I am so excited to be part of Urbane Publications 12 Days Of Christmas blog tour, and today I have a review to share with you of The Man Who Played with Trains by Richard Whittle.  Richard has also taken some time out to answer a few questions about his book, his reading and the road to publication, so sit back and enjoy!


Book Feature:

Description:

Cover 9781911331032(1).jpg

A gripping thriller for fans of Martin Cruz Smith, Jack Higgins and Robert Harris

Mining engineer John Spargo is distraught when his mother is attacked in her home and later dies from her injuries. He also discovers her home has been thoroughly searched.

Determined to track down her killer and discover the truth behind her death, John finds a connection between his late father’s wartime mine and the wreck of a U-Boat. The connection deepens when he discovers the diaries of the U-Boat captain and a wartime mission to spirit Göring to safety along with a fortune in stolen art. When John’s daughter Jez is kidnapped, he is contacted by a mysterious consortium. Her life hangs in the balance unless he can find the stolen art.
What is the link with his father’s abandoned mine? Who was the U-Boat captain? Did he survive and hide Göring’s treasures? John races against time to discover the truth…and in doing so may unearth secrets that were better left buried…

 

My Thoughts & Review:

One look at the description of this book was all it took for my interest to be piqued, I love WWII thrillers and anything that involves a bit of espionage, secrets and danger is always going to grab me!

Set over two timelines, The Man Who Played With Trains is a very cleverly written novel.  There is the story of John Spargo set in the present day, the tragic death of his mother following a horrific attack in her home has left him utterly distraught.  And whilst he is putting her affairs in order and sorting through her belongings he discovers a collection of journals written in German.  But this is only the beginning of the problems for John, his daughter is kidnapped and he must work out who killed his mother and why as well as find his daughter Jez.
Running parallel to this is the story of Theodore Volker, a German U-boat captain during WWII.  Theodore is a good man and good captain, he cares about his crew and doesn’t hold back when speaking his mind.  On his way home to be reunited with his young son he meets a stranger on a train who recruits him for a secret mission in the UK.

The writing is brilliant, you get a great sense of the settings and the characters with the great descriptions.  Although I initially felt more drawn to Theodore’s story, as the pace picked up I found that my attention was being drawn back to John in current day, and despite this being quite a hefty read it’s thrilling and exciting right the way through.  I particularity enjoyed seeing how the two timelines ran alongside each other, and it made this a very enjoyable read.  The plotting is clever and well thought out, its apparent from the details woven into the story that time and care has been taken to ensure that readers get a feeling of authenticity and feel immersed in the story.

Highly recommended for fans of historical fiction, mysteries and thrillers!

You can buy a copy of The Man Who Played With Trains via:

Amazon UK
Urbane Publications


Author Feature

Richard Whittle

Richard Whittle believes that he discovered the power of the novel and his love of writing at the age of eleven when he read Paul Gallico’s The Snow Goose and Jenny. On his overseas trips many years later he armed himself with an excess-baggage mix of paperbacks that did not include crime novels – as an ex-policeman he had vowed never to read them, let alone write them. Now, years later, he no longer feels that way. His central characters, people like you and me, find that they have been dragged into situations beyond their control and from which there seems little chance of escape. For them, crimes are most definitely involved.

Richard has been a policeman, a police marksman and police motorcyclist, a diesel engine tester, professional engineering geologist and Chartered Engineer. He has worked in civil engineering, geothermal energy, nuclear and mining industries in seventeen countries in Europe, Africa and the Americas and is able to draw on a wealth of personal experiences. Well known in his field as a technical writer, he spent time as a book reviewer for technical journals and regularly contributed to professional publications.

As a spare-time novelist he had several short stories published. In 2002, writing as Alan Frost, he was shortlisted for the Crime Writers Association’s Debut Dagger Award. More recently, his self-published novel, Playpits Park, has been downloaded as an eBook more than 4000 times.
Richard has been a trustee of a Scottish Charitable Organisation, acting first as its project manager and then its technical advisor. He now writes full time. He currently lives in the Scottish Borders, not too far away from Edinburgh.

 

For the readers, can you talk us through your background and the synopsis of your new novel?

I have been a policeman, diesel engine tester, mature student, engineer and geologist. As a geologist I often worked alone in godforsaken places, usually with nothing to do in the evenings except eat, drink and read. The drinking, I promise you, was modest. But the reading was not. Before leaving Heathrow or Gatwick I armed myself with paperbacks. After a while I started to fill my spare field notebooks with short stories (I even got two of the stories published).

Never, ever, did I think I had a story in me that had to come out. My work gave me so many ready-made backdrops: lost and alone in hundreds of square miles of forest in Canada (and there were bears!); having my passport seized in the airport of a Central African Republic, then taken at gunpoint and locked in a small room.

So, I had the scenery. What I needed now were characters and situations. That wasn’t too difficult. During my years in the police I’d come across plenty of those.

The Man Who Played Trains is a novel in two interwoven parts. One part, a contemporary story set in the north of Scotland, starts with an apparently pointless murder. The other, set in wartime Germany, is a tale of conspiracy and intrigue that the reader will guess is backstory to the Scottish murder, but (hopefully) is at a loss to know how or why. The two tales come together gradually.

 

 Can you talk us through the journey from idea to writing to publication?

It was a very long journey. The idea for The Man Who Played Trains came to me years ago. I knew the story I wanted to write and I spent long hours researching the German side of it, mostly in libraries. My big problem was that I didn’t know how best to present it. Then, as so often happens, the day job got in the way and I put away all my notes. Perhaps, one day, I would have time to write it…

My first published novel, Playpits Park, is around 80% flashback. The contemporary story moves seamlessly (so I’m told) into the past and back out again. It was an unsuitable format for The Man Who Played Trains. Finally I plumped for two separate, interlinked stories.

This might sound as if I decided what to write, wrote it, and then got published. As all writers will tell you, that isn’t the way it works. Several times over the years I became so discouraged by multiple rejections that I stopped submitting my work to agents and publishers. That does not mean I stopped writing, rewriting and editing. My hard drives and backups are a nightmare of novels and parts of novels – a digital attic of good stuff, bad stuff and indifferent stuff.

In 2016, Matthew Smith at independent publisher Urbane Publications, agreed to publish The Man Who Played Trains. I rewrote it for the umpteenth time and submitted it to the amazing Matthew.

 

 What are your favourite authors and recommended reads?

I have just read Stephanie Merrit’s five novels written under her pen name S J Parris. The novels are well-written and well-plotted. I have Michael Connelly’s latest in my to-read pile, and Robert Harris’s Munich. Also, I have just received a parcel of books from Urbane, so I have plenty to go on with. Recommended reads? Any novels by Kate Atkinson, S G Maclean, John Grisham, Kazuo Ishiguru.

 

What were your childhood/teenage favourite reads?

Jennie, by Paul Gallico. It made me realise how emotionally powerful writing could be. I also discovered John Wyndham’s SF novels and read them all. The children’s section librarians eventually gave in and let me take out adult books. Well, I’m sure you know what I mean.

My father bought a large set of encyclopaedias and I remember spending weeks paging through them, reading every entry that interested me (how weird is that?)

Because I am basically a techie person, when I was young I read as many technical and scientific books as I did novels.

 

What has been your favourite moment of being a published author?

Seeing 5-star reviews coming up on Amazon! I like to think that I write for myself rather than for readers, but in reality that is not true. The story is for me; the many rewrites and edits are for the reader. I know reviews aren’t everything, but positive ones are so encouraging. It means I have got things right.

 

 Who has been your source of support/encouragement, throughout the writing process?

Probably my greatest source of encouragement was Simon King, at the time a director at Random House. An early novel I submitted to the publisher attracted a personal reply, along with his red-penned edit of the first few pages. The two-page letter accompanying the returned typescript ended with ‘You will get published. It may take you some time‘.

Further encouragement came a few years later when I submitted a different novel, under a pseudonym, to the Crime Writers Association and was shortlisted for their Debut Dagger Award. At the award ceremony Ian Rankin presented me with a runner-up prize and said ‘Just keep writing…‘ No doubt this was oft-said advice to budding writers – but it was just what I needed to hear at the time.

 

Social Medial Links

Urbane: http://urbanepublications.com/book_author/richard-whittle/

Amazon: https://goo.gl/a4lWwY

Richard’s blog:  https://playpitspark.wordpress.com/

Richard’s Twitter: https://twitter.com/richard1whittle

Richard’s Facebook:  http://bit.ly/2xolpZB

 

urbanechristmas

 

 

Read Full Post »

512bwramvyzl-_sx317_bo1204203200_

 

** My thanks to Rachel at Rachel’s Random Resources for my copy of this book **

 

Description:

Love can drive you crazy… in more ways than one!

When Abby met Simon, it was the start of something special, a love Abby believed would last a lifetime.

A wedding, two daughters and fifteen years later Abby’s world is falling apart. Having discovered Simon has had an affair her normally ordered mind is spiralling out of control. Crushed by the betrayal and shocked by her own reaction, she knows she needs to get herself together. She’s just not sure where to start.

With Simon on a mission to win her back and a close friend hiding a secret that could push her further over the edge, Abby finds strength and support where she least expects it. But as she attempts to gain control of her life and make decisions about her future, it may be more than the limits of Abby’s mind that are put to the test!

My Thoughts & Review:

I have to admit to being pleasantly surprised by this book, there’s certainly a lot more to it than meets the eye and I might have let it pass me by if it hadn’t been for one my favourite bloggers bringing it to my attention.

The central character Abby is one that I think many readers will like, she has a wonderful sense of humour and the situation that she finds herself in makes for an interesting and thought provoking read.
Having discovered that her husband has cheated on her she is understandably crushed, she struggles to control her emotions and it takes the friendship of her fellow teachers Melissa and Brad to help her pull through.  Her flirtations with Brad are something she feels are harmless, and whether they are intended to make her husband Simon jealous, or just to make her feel a little better about herself, I couldn’t decide.

What I hadn’t expected was the journey into Abby’s mind, learning how she deals with the anger and frustrations of what Simon has done (as well as “the other woman”), watching her attempts at flirting with Brad gives the readers the notion that deep down she is still in love with her husband, but she needs to decide if she can forgive and forget or whether to end things with him.

This is quite a thought provoking read, and one that has wit and charm sprinkled throughout.  The plot is interesting, the characters are well created and although some are not the most likeable in some instances, I do think that this is still an impressive debut novel and I would be keen to read more from this author.

You can buy a copy of Crazy Over You via

Amazon UK

Read Full Post »

Blackmail Sex Lies - Cover for advertising

** My thanks to Rachel and to Kathryn for my copy of this and for inviting me to be part of the blog tour **

 

Description:

Blackmail, Sex and Lies is a story of deception, scandal, and fractured traditional Victorian social values. It is the tale of a naïve, young woman caught up in a whirlwind romance with a much older man. However, both have personality flaws that result in poor choices, and ultimately lead to a tragic end.

For 160 years, people have believed Madeleine Smith to have been guilty of murder. But was she? Could she have been innocent after all?

This Victorian murder mystery, based on a true story, takes place in Glasgow, Scotland, 1857. It explores the disastrous romance between the vivacious socialite, Madeleine Hamilton Smith, and her working class lover, Pierre Emile L’Angelier.

After a two-year torrid, and forbidden relationship with L’Angelier, that takes place against her parents’ wishes, the situation changes dramatically when William Minnoch enters the scene. This new man in Madeleine’s life is handsome, rich, and of her social class. He is also a man of whom her family approve.

Sadly, insane jealous rages, and threats of blackmail, are suddenly silenced by an untimely death.

My Thoughts & Review:

I’ve always had a soft spot for historical fiction, but usually I’m quite specific of the era that I read, however something about the sound of this book intrigued me and I wanted to know more.

Kathryn McMaster weaves together the scandalous story detailing the love affair and murder trial of socialite Madeleine Hamilton Smith and her working class lover Pierre Emile L’Angelier.  Madeleine and Pierre’s relationship was met with disapproval, a high class and well-to-do young lady should not have been mixing with a working class man, and their affair would not be acknowledged or accepted by society.  Upon realising this, Madeleine is keen to call the whole thing off but Pierre has other ideas and pursues for her two years. 

During this time Madeleine meets the more socially acceptable William Minnoch who is more suitable however this serves to make Pierre jealous.  

Pierre’s regular use of arsenic is well known, and the reader also finds out that Madeleine has purchased arsenic on many occasions, so when Pierre’s body is discovered she is suspected of poisoning him to clear the way for marrying Minnoch and must fight to try clearing her name.

Through the use of letters, readers are privy to a wonderful insight into the characters.  The letters show the affair between Madeleine and Pierre as it develops, but they also show how Madeleine requested Pierre to return the letters so they could not be used as proof of their relationship.  A really great way to give readers an glimpse into the minds of complex characters and it really increases the intrigue surrounding the events within.

An enjoyable read and one that I found had me thinking long after I’d finished the book.  I just can’t decide whether Madeleine was guilty or not….

 

You can buy a copy of Blackmail, Sex and Lies via:

Amazon UK
Amazon US

And as a special treat, this book is available for 99p/c for the duration of the blog tour, so if you want to read it I’d recommend heading over to Amazon now and snapping up a copy before the tour ends on 14th December!!

 

About the Author:

Blackmail Sex Lies - kathry-macmaster-author

Kathryn McMaster is a writer, entrepreneur, wife, mother, and champion of good indie authors. She co-owns the book promotion company One Stop Fiction (www.onestopfiction.com), where readers can sign up to receive news of free and discounted 4 and 5 star reviewed books. She is also a bestselling author of historical murder mysteries set in the Victorian and Edwardian eras. Her debut novel, “Who Killed Little Johnny Gill?” was well received. All her novels are based on true stories, and she melds fact with fiction, writing in the creative nonfiction style. She lives on her 30 acre farm in the beautiful Casentino Valley, Italy for 6 months of the year, and during the other half of the year, on the small island of Gozo, Malta.

Social Media Links –

www.kathrynmcmaster.com

https://twitter.com/TrueCrimeNovels

https://www.facebook.com/kathrynmcmaster.author/

Follow the blog tour:

Blackmail Sex and Lies - Full Banner(2)

 

Read Full Post »

518vxf38gsl-_sx323_bo1204203200_

 

** My thanks to Anne Cater and the folks at Transworld Books for my copy of this book and for inviting me to be part of the blog tour **

 

Description:

When a paragraph in an evening newspaper reveals a decades-old tragedy, most readers barely give it a glance. But for three strangers it’s impossible to ignore.

For one woman, it’s a reminder of the worst thing that ever happened to her.

For another, it reveals the dangerous possibility that her darkest secret is about to be discovered.

And for the third, a journalist, it’s the first clue in a hunt to uncover the truth.

The Child’s story will be told.

 

My Thoughts & Review:

The Child is the second novel by Fiona Barton, and features her character Kate Waters.  Barton takes her readers on a chilling journey through complex themes of mental health issues and abuse with dignity and sensitivity whilst ensuring that her wonderful writing wows readers.

Told through four perspectives, this is a story of four women and how they are affected by  the discovery of a newborn baby’s body .  The secrets that are unearthed and the impact they have on family dynamics make for some intense reading that will have readers struggling to put this book down.
As I mentioned above, there are some themes woven into the plot that could make for difficult reading, but I do believe that the author has done a good job in ensuring that they add to the story without becoming sensationalised.
The cleverness of the writing means that readers are kept guessing with the twists and red herrings dotted around.

Perhaps it’s because she was my namesake, but I really loved journalist Kate.  Her drive to investigate and find out the truth was impressive and certainly could show a few fictional detectives a thing or two!  Her integrity makes her such a wonderful character, despite wanting to chase down a story she is always careful to never reveal her informants information.  All of the characters in this book felt realistic and well thought out, their backstories were intriguing and I found that the more I read the more invested in them I became.

The build up in the pace of this book is perfect, slowly building up and drawing you in.  Hinting at mystery and suspense before the conclusion that will leave readers surprised and full of emotion!  I loved the short chapters that were perfectly baited, it kept me hooked and needing to read “just one more chapter” before bedtime.

A cleverly complex thriller that will test the strength of your heart!

You can buy a copy of The Child via:

Amazon UK
Wordery
Book Depository

 

Follow the blog tour:

The Child PB blog tour poster 2(1).jpg

 

Read Full Post »

Breaking Bones

 

** My thanks to Hannah at Endeavour Press for my copy of this book and for inviting me to be part of the blog tour **

 

Description:

The streets of Preston are alive with music and banter. But nothing can drown out the sound of breaking bones
Inseparable since childhood and feared by their community, Tony, Eddie and Frankie are beyond the reach of justice. The brutal gang, The Three Dogs, are a law unto themselves.
Detective Jim Hacker has watched The Dogs grow from thuggish youths to psychotic criminals. He seems to be the only one who wants to see their empire fall.
Meanwhile Jamie Strange, a young Royal Marine, finds himself embroiled in the lives of The Three Dogs when his girlfriend, Laurie Holland, cuts off their engagement… to be with the most dangerous of The Dogs: Frankie Verdi.
Jamie vows to save Laurie, before Frankie damns them both.
Every dog will have its day…
This gritty, addictive crime story fizzes with the energy of the eighties. 
Breaking Bones will appeal to fans of Martina Cole, Roberta Kray and Stephen Leather.

My Thoughts & Review:

The 1980s setting of this book intrigued me enough to pick this one up, having been a child of the 80s I’m always interested to see how the decade translates onto the pages of a book, and I was pleasantly surprised with Breaking Bones.  The setting felt authentic (as far as my acquired knowledge would permit), the fashions and music of the time definitely felt authentic that’s for sure!

In Breaking Bones, the reader watches the rise of three lads to the dizzy heights of criminal kingship through the eyes of Detective Jim Hacker, the three lads in question, “The Three Dogs”; Frankie, Eddie and Tony were childhood friends.  All three have an unhealthy fascination with violence and are quick to leap to violence in any situation.  Detective Hacker is a fantastic narrator, his obsession with the trio feels so real and dangerous that readers cannot help but become somewhat involved with it too.  Like any detective, his gut instinct tells him that Frankie, Eddie and Tony are responsible for more crimes than the police can prove, but to get the proof that’s needed he will have to sit and wait for them to mess up.

Jamie Strange finds that the tentacles of The Three Dogs have a way of creeping into his life when his fiancée Lauren leaves him for Frankie.  Instead of disliking Lauren for her actions, I ended up feeling sympathy towards her.  She’s a well written character that readers will become invested in.

The plot is dark and gritty, is has elements of brutality which add to the story line, and over all it’s a well paced novel.  The gangland element combined with the crime thriller makes this an enjoyable read and one that I think would appeal to fans of crime novels.

You can buy a copy of Breaking Bones via:

Amazon UK

 

Follow the blog tour:

Breaking_Bones FINAL

Read Full Post »

Hello and welcome along to another post to celebrate indie publishing, which today sees The Quiet Knitter joining in the blog tour for Andrew Barrett’s The End of Lies published by Bloodhound Books.


Andrew Barrett - The End of Lies_cover_high res.jpg

**  My thanks to Sarah at Bloodhound Books for my copy of this and for inviting me to be part of the blog tour **

 

Description:

My name is Becky. I arrived home to find my husband, Chris, stabbed to death and a gang of men ransacking our house.
Turns out that Chris has something that belongs to them. And if I want to stay alive, I have to find it and return it. They have given me seven days. And a beating.
There is nowhere to hide and no time left to look. So I will stand my ground as the deadline approaches. All I have is a head full of lies and a very bad plan.
This is my story.

 

My Thoughts & Review:

Wow!  From the moment I started reading this book I didn’t want to put it down!  It’s dark and gripping and full of so much intrigue that readers cannot help but become hooked from the first chapter.

Told from the perspective of Becky, who has just discovered the body of her husband Chris,  stabbed to death on the living room floor.  She takes on a persona that I have to admit had be swaying between wondering if she had a death wish, or was merely panic taking over.  She has to “it” over to the gang that have murdered her husband, she agrees, not knowing what “it” is or where to find “it”.
From the narrative it is clear that these are not people to mess with, so goodness knows why Becky decides to take them on and try to get the better of them.  See what I mean about wondering what was going through her head?
She’s quite a strong character, and finding your partner’s murdered body would be enough to make the strongest people crumple into a heap but not Becky, the situation demands she gets her act together to save her neck.

By giving Becky a week to hand over whatever it is the gang are looking for, the author ensures that the pace of this book remains brisk and the plot thrilling.  This is an “edge of your seat” sort of read, the sort that I was glad to be reading on my kindle so I didn’t have to waste time fumbling with pages to find out what was coming.

The writing is clever, its punchy and it makes for a thrilling read.  The plot is gritty and exciting, the characters are so well crafted that they feel real, the fear and intimidation, the panic, the guilt, it’s all so wonderfully written that you find yourself drawn into the book .
Andrew Barrett is an author you will want to add to your list of favoured authors based on this book alone.

You can buy a copy of End of Lies via Amazon UK

 

About the Author:

Andrew Barrett has enjoyed variety in his professional life, from engine-builder to farmer, from Oilfield Service Technician in Kuwait, to his current role of Senior CSI in Yorkshire.

He’s been a CSI since 1996, and has worked on all scene types from terrorism to murder, suicide to rape, drugs manufacture to bomb scenes. One way or another, Andrew’s life revolves around crime.

In 1997 he finished his first crime thriller, A Long Time Dead, and it’s still a readers’ favourite today, some 120,000 copies later, topping the Amazon charts several times. Two more books featuring SOCO Roger Conniston completed the trilogy.

Today, Andrew is still producing high-quality, authentic crime thrillers with a forensic flavour that attract attention from readers worldwide. He’s also attracted attention from the Yorkshire media, having been featured in the Yorkshire Post, and twice interviewed on BBC Radio Leeds.

He’s best known for his lead character, CSI Eddie Collins, and the acerbic way in which he roots out criminals and administers justice. Eddie’s series is four books and two short stories in length, and there’s still more to come.

Andrew is a proud Yorkshireman and sets all of his novels there, using his home city of Leeds as another major, and complementary, character in each of the stories.

You can find out more about him and his writing at Andrew-barrett.co.uk

Social Media Links:

Contact: andrew@andrewbarrett.co.uk

Website: http://www.andrewbarrett.co.uk/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/AndrewBarrettUK

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AndrewBarrett.author

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/andrewbarrettauthor/

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/andrewbarrettauthor

Follow the tour:

BLOG TOUR (2)

 

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

On The Shelf Books

A bookblog for readers

Gem's Quiet Corner

Welcome to my little corner. Grab a cup of tea, find your happy place and join me to talk all things books...

Creating Perfection

Delicately balancing the voice of the author with the needs of the reader

THE CHLOE DOUGLAS BLOG

A LIFESTYLE BLOG WITH PLENTY OF BOOK REVIEWS

Books and Wine Gums

Reviews of all-sorts (*but not liquorice-based confections)

The Pioneer Woman

Plowing through Life in the Country...One Calf Nut at a Time

LIVE AND DEADLY

(Mostly) Fiction reviews with a crime slant

Clues and Reviews

A Blog For Book Lovers by A Book Lover!

Secret Library Book Blog

Books, Books, Books

the orang-utan librarian

welcome to the virtual library

TheCraftyLass

TheCraftyLass Goes Postal : sharing my love of all things bookish, crafty, geeky, cooking & snail mail

Cheryl M-M's Book Blog

What can I say? I just love books. Indie/self/trad published...I don't give two monkeys. My reviews are always my subjective and honest opinion. Nothing more and nothing less.

IFINDOUBTREAD

Don't Get Left On The Shelf

mybookishblogspot

Just books, more books and some other stuff too

booksaremycwtches

Reading takes me to other worlds. Other times and other places.

Sarah's Vignettes

Ramblings about books and life