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Solomon Creed

Author: Simon Toyne
Published: 24 March 2016
Reviewed: 3 June 2016
What Milo Saw by Virginia Macgregor

Read more at: http://www.london24.com/entertainment/book_review_what_milo_saw_by_virginia_macgregor_1_3750981
Copyright © LONDON24


Copy supplied by Killer Reads at HarperCollins in return for an honest review

4.5 out of 5 Stars

 

Description:   

My Thoughts & Review


Solomon Creed is an interesting character, for a start he emerges unscathed from a plan crash in the middle of rural America, but even more intriguing is that he has no idea who he is or why he is there.
As the narration develops and other characters are introduced, we discover that Creed is also fascinating in his physical appearance, he is an albino, something that is never seen in the town of Redemption.  
With the ability to speak numerous different languages, a wealth of knowledge and skills that surprise even himself, Creed is definitely an enigma.  But little by little, snippets of his memory clear so that by the end he has a good idea of why he ended up in Redemption, what his purpose here was and who he isThe most mind blowing answer definitely has to be the latter – once that’s revealed….wow! 

Redemption is a small town in Arizona, built around the church, and instead of the inhabitants being friendly and helpful as you might expect, they are suspicious of newcomers and locals alike.  Worse still, Creed can feel there’s something going on in the town, secrets are being buried and he is sure this is linked to why he is there.  
The links to a Mexican Crime Boss, despicable Sheriffs and desperate town mayor add a sinister edge to the goings on in this town.

With narration in the form of historical journal entries by the town founder as well as present day narration by several characters, this really does add something “extra” to the plot.  
The religious angles meld well with the almost supernatural elements of the book – indeed it helps it to stand out from other books in this genre.  The super natural aspect of the story does feel like something out of an episode of the X Files, not entirely plausible but at the same time not entirely indisputable.      
  
Action packed chapters ensure that the reader is kept entertained and intrigued, who is fighting for whom?  Who are the good guys?  What are they all after?  The pace of this book is also kept brisk with this style of writing, the murder mystery element makes for a thrilling read and with characters that are multi dimensional, well fleshed out and in some cases downright villainous, you’ve got a great read on your hands.  

Despite some more complicated ideas in this book, it is still an enjoyable read.  Some of the religious passages may not be to everyone’s tastes, but it’s definitely worth sticking with it and seeing it through to the end, in this book I would definitely say they work and go as far as to add depth to the tale. 

After finding out Solomon Creed’s identity, I cannot wait to see where the author takes this character next, a brilliant stepping stone for the next book!   


You can buy a copy of Solomon Creed here. 
 

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The Memory Weaver

Author : Jane Kirkpatrick
Published: 01 September 2015
Reviewed: 11 September 2015

What Milo Saw by Virginia Macgregor

Read more at: http://www.london24.com/entertainment/book_review_what_milo_saw_by_virginia_macgregor_1_3750981
Copyright © LONDON24

Copy kindly supplied by Revell in return for an honest review via NetGalley.

 

3 out of 5 stars


Eliza Spalding Warren was just a child when she was taken hostage by the Cayuse Indians during a massacre in 1847. Now a mother of two, Eliza faces a new kind of dislocation; her impulsive husband wants to make a new start in another territory, which will mean leaving her beloved home and her mother’s grave–and returning to the land of her captivity.

Haunted by memories and hounded by struggle, Eliza longs to know how her mother dealt with the trauma of their ordeal. As she searches the pages of her mother’s diary, Eliza is stunned to find that her own recollections tell only part of the story.

Based on true events, The Memory Weaver is New York Times bestselling author Jane Kirkpatrick’s latest literary journey into the past, where threads of western landscapes, family, and faith weave a tapestry of hope inside every pioneering woman’s heart. Get swept up in this emotional story of the memories that entangle us and the healing that awaits us when we bravely unravel the threads of the past.

 
The novel is based on the true story of Eliza Spalding Warren, and not knowing anything about her I did a little research online before reading just to give myself an understanding of who she was.  
The opening pages of this novel filled me with dread, the lengthy character list was almost enough to put me off reading this, thinking there was no way I would manage to remember who all the characters were and what their place in the story was.  Whilst the list was useful as a point of reference, it really didn’t work well as the first pages of the Kindle copy of the novel I reviewed. 

After the troubles in 1847 and the death of Eliza’s mother a few years later, she becomes carer to her younger siblings and father, before meeting and marrying Andrew Spalding and having his children.  
 
As the story unfolds, the narration switches back and forth between Eliza and her mother’s diary entries, for me this seemed to slow the pace of reading drastically.  The diary entries were necessary to explain historical events and give detail that only Eliza Spalding (deceased) could give, but at the same time there was a lot of repetition in those entries so I did find that it was tempting to skip ahead sometimes. 

The novel does teach you that memories are not always as truthful as you think they are, events can be remembered differently by some people and that discovery in the novel was quite interesting.  

However, in all honesty, I felt this novel lacked something.  It held my interest long enough to finish it, but I have to admit that I was glad to have finished it to move on to reading something else.  

I would recommend this book to anyone that enjoys Historical novels, and Religious novels. 

I would like to thank Revell for the copy of this book in return for an honest review and if you would like to buy a copy, this book will be published on .  A copy can be purchased here The Memory Weaver (UK Kindle Version)
 

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