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As the countdown to 2018 ticks merrily on,  I thought I would extend my Celebrating Indie Publishing round up of the brilliant books and authors who have taken part in this feature by recapping the fantastic books by No Exit Press that I’ve had the privilege of reading this year.

As I’ve mentioned in the previous posts, it really has been an honour to work with some amazing publishers and authors this year, and without them this feature would never have been possible!   I’d like to take a wee moment to say “Thank You” to each of the publishers and authors who have taken part in this feature, who have kindly filled in the Q&A form that I sent out, have written guest posts or have kindly sent copies of books for me to read and review – your support has been invaluable and I truly appreciate you all!

Here’s some of the books from No Exit Press that have featured on The Quiet Knitter this year:

 

Reviews of each book can be found by following these links (there are also author features with Howard Linskey and Leigh Russell with the reviews of their books):

Hunting The Hangman by Howard Linskey
The Frozen Woman by Jon Michelet
Deadly Alibi by Leigh Russell
The Unquiet Dead by Ausma Zehanat Khan

 

I have been lucky enough to read more than these books by No Exit Press this year, some of them have been regular reads or ones that were part of blog tours … and there are one or two on my radar to read during my January break from blogging.  These guys are bringing some amazing books to readers, check out their website for details of what’s coming up!

I hope that Celebrating Indie Publishing has helped you find some great new books to try this year, or perhaps opened your eyes to other books that you might have missed. It’s certainly been a blast for me and I’ve loved every moment of it!

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Hello and welcome along to The Quiet Knitter! It’s Friday, and that can only mean one thing (well for here anyway!), it’s time for another post to “Celebrate Indie Publishing”.
This week I am delighted to bring you a book from No Exit Press and I thoroughly recommend checking them out both as they have some cracking books to offer! Today’s book in the spotlight is Hunting the Hangman by Howard Linskey and he’s kindly taken some time out to face a grilling for the author feature.


Book Feature:

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TWO MEN. . . ONE MISSION. . . TO KILL THE MAN WITH THE IRON HEART

Bestselling author Howard Linskey’s fifteen year fascination with the assassination attempt on Reinhard Heydrich, the architect of the holocaust, has produced a meticulously researched, historically accurate thriller with a plot that echoes The Day of the Jackal and The Eagle has Landed.

2017 marks the 75th anniversary of the attack on a man so evil even fellow SS officers referred to him as the ‘Blond Beast’. In Prague he was known as the Hangman. Hitler, who called him ‘The Man with the Iron Heart’, considered Heydrich to be his heir, and entrusted him with the implementation of the ‘Final Solution’ to the Jewish question: the systematic murder of eleven million people.

In 1942 two men were trained by the British SOE to parachute back into their native Czech territory to kill the man ruling their homeland. Jan Kubis and Josef Gabcik risked everything for their country. Their attempt on Reinhard Heydrich’s life was one of the single most dramatic events of the Second World War, with horrific consequences for thousands of innocent people.

Hunting the Hangman is a tale of courage, resilience and betrayal with a devastating finale. Based on true events, the story reads like a classic World War Two thriller and is the subject of two big-budget Hollywood films that coincide with the anniversary of Operation Anthropoid.

 

My Thoughts & Review:

Reinhard Heydrich was a figure that loomed largely during WWII, tales of his most evil deeds and thoughts about those he deemed of a lesser standing than himself or members of the Nazi party have been well documented over the years.  His ruthless and evil ways have marked him as one of the most dangerous men in The Third Reich, his desires driven by greed and obstinance.

Howard Linskey has researched his novel well, and in doing so has ensured that he can present a novel that does not shy away from the atrocities and harrowing moments in history, instead it states them in a very matter of fact fashion.
Whilst this is a fictionalised account of Operation Anthropoid, it is still a very interesting piece of work with some of the best characterisation I’ve ever read.  The portrayal of each of the major characters feels incredibly detailed, the way that Heydrich comes across on the pages is downright terrifying.  Linskey did well writing such a in depth and rounded portrayal of Heydrich, showing the many faces that this man possessed.  The way that the reader is privy to his thoughts, hears of his love of his father’s music, sees him as a father jars somewhat with the reality that he was one of “the main architects of the Holocaust”.

The two characters who stole my heart were Jan Kubiš and Jozef Gabčík, from the moment they first appeared they had my full attention.  Watching them come alive through Linskey’s writing was wonderful to watch, but equally the more they came alive for me the more connected to them I felt, the more invested in them I became and in turn the more heartbroken I would become as I read on, aware at what fate awaited them with the mission they’d been tasked with.  It’s rare that I will begin to hope that an author has used artistic license in a book such as this, hoping that they will change the outcome so that characters I’ve become attached to won’t face the outcome that I know is reality, and here I did hope that could be the case.

Such an evocative read, and one that is so intensely powerful.  The writing is absolutely superb and so atmospheric, the sense of foreboding and poignancy that builds throughout is almost breathtaking.  I cannot recommend it highly enough!

 

You can buy a copy of Hunting the Hangman via:

Amazon UK
Wordery
Book Depository


 

Author Feature:

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Howard Linskey is the author of three novels in the David Blake crime series published by No Exit Press, The Drop, The Damage and The Dead. Harry Potter producer, David Barron optioned a TV adaptation of The Drop, which was voted one of the Top Five Thrillers of the Year by The TimesThe Damage was voted one of The Times‘ Top Summer Reads. He is also the author of No Name Lane, Behind Dead Eyes and The Search, the first three books in a crime series set in the north east of England featuring journalists Tom Carney & Helen Norton, published by Penguin. His latest book, Hunting the Hangman, is a historical thriller about the assassination of Reinhard Heydrich in Prague during WW2.

Originally from Ferryhill in County Durham, he now lives in Hertfordshire with his wife Alison and daughter Erin.

 

What’s your most favourite thing about being an author?

There are so many good things about being an author. I am my own boss to an extent and have escaped the drudge of the commute, the office politics, the need to ever wear a suit again, apart from at weddings and funerals and the insidious pressure that comes with a conventional job. I’m doing what I love and get to see a book with my name and a Penguin logo on it when I am finished, which is a lovely feeling. I get some great feedback from readers too. The very best thing though is that I am there every day when my daughter comes home from school, so I get to spend more time with her than most dads and you cannot put a price on that.

What’s your least favourite thing about being an author?

The fretting. There is quite a lot of that. For example; is this book I am writing any good or is it the biggest pile of excrement ever dreamed up by any author? Then there is; will anyone stock this book, closely followed by will anyone buy the blooming thing if they do and then will they actually like it? Somehow it always seems to work out all right in the end but I have come to realise the fretting will never quite stop no matter how much progress I make. I’ve had seven books published now and it never seems to get any easier on the fretting front.

If you could have written any book what would it be and why?

I find it hard to pick my all-time top-ten books, let alone single just one out, but if I absolutely have to, I will go for ‘Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy’ by John Le Carre, which is a beautifully written novel about betrayal that also works as a mystery and a whodunnit, all wrapped up in a cold war spy story. There’s some wonderful dialogue and a wholly satisfying conclusion too. At his best, Le Carre is a marvellous author.

How do you spend your time when you’re not wrapped up plotting your next book?

Procrastinating mostly. Authors are world champion procrastinators. ‘Why put off tomorrow what we can put off today, tomorrow and most of next week’ should be our motto. Every day starts with such good intentions on the writing front but by the time I have read The Times, replied to emails, gone on Facebook and twitter, read the latest horrifying news about Donald Trump’s behaviour and checked to see if Newcastle United have finally signed a player, I have often lost hours. I then panic and have an intense burst of writing, powered by guilt. Somehow it’s quite effective and it works for me. I’ve come to realise too that even when an author is out walking the dog, driving or having a shower they are never quite off-duty and those are the moments when ideas usually come and begin to germinate. That’s my excuse anyway.

Do you have a set routine for writing? Rituals you have to observe? I.e. specific pen, silence, day or night etc.

One of the things I like about being an author is the flexibility to do things when I am in the mood to do them and not on a nine-to-five basis, so as long as I have a few hours each day and the opportunity to write a 1,000 to 1,500 words, I don’t really mind when and where this is. Sometimes I work at home, either in my office or somewhere comfy with the lap top on my knee but, if I get stir crazy and need people around me, I like to pop out and work at the local library or in a café. I even do my edits in the pub with a pint of bitter close at hand. That’s definitely one of the perks of being a writer unfortunately the beer is not tax-deductable.

 

A huge thank you to Howard for taking part and for sharing some more about himself, it’s always nice to get to know the person behind a book.  And i have to agree about Le Carre, a genius when it comes to writing and one author who’s books I cannot live without.
If you would like to know more about Howard and his books, check out the following link:

Website: http://www.howardlinskey.co.uk/

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