Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Love Books Group’

  • Title: The Betrayal
  • Author: Anne Allen
  • Publisher: Sarnia Press
  • Publication Date: 20th October 2017

Copy purchased via Amazon.co.uk

Description:

Book Six of The Guernsey Novels is another dual-time story set during the German Occupation and present-day Guernsey and is likely to appeal particularly to fans of the book The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society.

Treachery and theft lead to death – and love

1940. Teresa Bichard and her baby are sent by her beloved husband, Leo, to England as the Germans draw closer to Guernsey. Days later they invade…

1942. Leo, of Jewish descent, is betrayed to the Germans and is sent to a concentration camp, never to return. 

1945. Teresa returns to find Leo did not survive and the family’s valuable art collection, including a Renoir, is missing. Heartbroken, she returns to England.

2011. Nigel and his twin Fiona, buy a long-established antique shop in Guernsey and during a refit, find a hidden stash of paintings, including what appears to be a Renoir. Days later, Fiona finds Nigel dead, an apparent suicide. Refusing to accept the verdict, a distraught Fiona employs a detective to help her discover the truth

Searching for the rightful owner of the painting brings Fiona close to someone who opens a chink in her broken heart. Can she answer some crucial questions before laying her brother’s ghost to rest?

Who betrayed Leo? 

Who knew about the stolen Renoir?

And are they prepared to kill – again?

My Thoughts:

Like the previous post for this blog tour, I want to add that I read this book back in 2018 for a blog tour and absolutely loved it. And because I loved the book so much, I bought a copy straight after to add to my collection on my digital bookshelf. Having read it again for this blog tour, I’ve added some extra thoughts to my original review.

The mystery of this book appealed to me, what was the connection between the events in the 1940s and 2011?  And the beauty of these books is that they can all be read as standalone novels, despite being part of The Guernsey Novels series.

With a story that moves back and forth between the two time settings, readers learn about Leo and his wife Teresa on Guernsey, how they are preparing for invasion by the Nazis and their parting is of necessity.  Once Leo gets his wife and child to safety he awaits his fate along with the remaining islanders.
In 2011 Fiona stumbles upon the body of her twin brother Nigel in their antique shop, an apparent suicide that makes no sense to Fiona or any of their friends.  She sets out to prove to the police that they are wrong, not realising the danger she might be putting herself in.

I enjoyed the way that the stories of Leo and Fiona ran alongside each other, each of their lives filled with moments of heightened emotions, whether trauma and fear, happiness and love.  I perhaps felt a little more connected to the tale of Leo and the Nazi occupation due to having an interest in stories set in this time.  Leo’s life was undoubtedly lonely once he got his wife and child to safety, reading the short narrative where he mentions his love for them both was heart warming and when he recounts the memory of meeting his wife for the first time, it gives readers a wonderful insight into this character.
It did feel that Fiona’s story took up more of the narrative and it needed to, it was the driving force of the plot.  But I felt less connected to it, less invested, but this is down to personal preference. And I always applaud an author who can create a character that intrigues me but possesses characteristics or quirks that don’t instantly gel with me. 

The descriptions of the settings are so clear and vivid, Guernsey sounds like such a beautiful place and so appealing.  The beaches sound breathtaking and the way that the scenery comes to life through the writing makes this a delight to read.  I enjoyed the way that this history of the island was told through the characters and indeed finding out more about the way that the occupation impacted on the lives of the islanders was very interesting.

A well written mystery with touches of romance and danger, and highly recommended!

Read Full Post »

  • Title: The Inheritance
  • Author: Anne Allen
  • Publisher: Sarnia Press
  • Publication Date: 8th April 2019

Copy purchased via Amazon.co.uk

Description:

How close were Victor Hugo and his copyist?

1862 Young widow Eugénie faces an uncertain future in Guernsey. A further tragedy brings her to the attention of Monsieur Victor Hugo, living in exile on the island only yards away from Eugénie’s home. Their meeting changes her life and she becomes his copyist, forming a strong friendship with both Hugo and his mistress, Juliette Drouet.

2012 Dr Tess Le Prevost, Guernsey-born but living in England, is shocked to inherit her Great-Aunt’s house on the island. As a child, she was entranced by Doris’s tales of their ancestor, Eugénie, whose house this once was, and her close relationship with Hugo. Was he the real father of her child? Returning to the island gives Tess a fresh start and a chance to unlock family secrets.

Will she discover the truth about Eugénie and Hugo? A surprise find may hold the answer as Tess embraces new challenges which test her strength – and her heart.

My Thoughts:

I should add a note that I read this book last year around publication date for a blog tour and absolutely loved it. And because I loved the book so much, I bought a copy straight after to add to my collection on my digital bookshelf.

The linking of two timelines always appeals to me in a novel, and I know from the outset that any of Anne Allen’s books will be just the right mix of modern day and historic setting. With characters in 2012 and 1862, we span a few centuries but see in both of these times circumstances that impact on society then as much as they do now.
Eugénie in 1862 is mourning the loss of her new husband, his death at sea robbing her of happiness and companionship, and so a chance meeting with Victor Hugo opens her eyes to a world she could never have imagined. She is a character that we slowly watch transform through the pages, the once quiet and withdrawn young woman becomes more confident, more sure in her own skin and begins to move on after the early tragedies that befell her. The friendships she forms are a lifeline for her, they are a comfort to her and they enable her to be Eugénie again, and not just a sad widow.
2012 brings the reader the story of Tess, a young doctor finishing off her training in Exeter. Stunned to learn that she has inherited the home of her Great- Aunt on Guernsey, she makes the life changing decision to move back to her beloved island, and make a life there. But if that wasn’t enough to deal with, there are the simple matters of family politics, clearing out the possessions of her Great-Aunt and unravelling a myth that has run through her family for generations, thrown into the mix.

In both Eugénie and Tess, we see strong female characters who take control of situations they are in. There are times that life throws them a curveball, makes things somewhat difficult for them, but these women are wonderful to watch, they take it in their stride, use the events to give them courage, strength and ultimately adapt.
The mystery element of the plot is fascinating, readers follow Tess as she pieces Eugénie’s life together to form a narrative that gladdens and breaks the heart in equal measure, as well as experience events through the perspective of Eugénie. In Anne Allen’s hands, this is done with sympathy as well as highlighting the harshness of situations that her characters find themselves in.

There’s something comforting about picking up a book from this author, she has a wonderful way of bringing a story alive with rich and atmospheric settings, I felt like I could see the sights of Guernsey, like I could see the houses that she described, I felt like I got to know the characters and became so invested in them. I shared their frustrations, their sorrows, their confusion and eventually, their happiness.
Of all of the Guernsey novels, I think that this has been my favourite so far, I can’t quite put my finger on what it was that grabbed my heart, but something about this book has lingered on after I read the last page. It’s perhaps just my head wondering “what next?” for Tess, her family and her friends, but I do know that I thoroughly enjoyed this book and absolutely recommend it, and all of the books.

All of the books in this series can be read as standalone.

Read Full Post »

  • Title: Sisters of Berlin
  • Author: Juliet Conlin
  • Publisher: Black and White Publishing
  • Publication Date: 16th April 2020

Copy received from publisher for review purposes.

Description:

Berlin 2014.
The 25th anniversary of the fall of the Wall, and the city is gearing up for a celebration of unity and liberation. But, beneath the surface, are those for whom the divisions and allegiances of the past remain close to home.

In her hushed and leafy corner of Berlin, Nina’s life is a comfortable, conventional one– until her younger sister Marie, a free-spirited writer, is attacked and left for dead.

For Nina, Marie’s brutal demise – and that of her unborn child – tips her own carefully controlled life into a nightmare. Stonewalled by official incompetence and subterfuge, Nina begins to realise that her sister’s past and the secrets of the once-divided city are connected in unimaginable ways. As she seeks out justice for Marie, Nina becomes caught in a tangle of obsessions, lies and hidden truths that threatens to destroy her marriage, her livelihood and all that she holds dear.

My Thoughts:

Juliet Conlin is one of those authors that you just know will hold your attention and entrance you with her wonderful writing and transport you entirely to the scenes of her book, and so when I heard about Sisters of Berlin, I was keen to read it and find out what she had lined up.

It has to be said that in each of her previous books there is a wonderful human element, Conlin creates realistic characters that come alive as you read about their lives and you cannot help but become invested in them. You share in their grief, their happiness, their confusion and equally when their lives spiral out of control, you feel the disorienting crashes of that whirlpool as it tosses you to and fro. And that is much the case for Nina in this book. Her once happy life is turned upside down after the murder of her sister Marie, and she feels that she cannot rely on the police to get to the bottom of the case. Delving into the dark corners of Marie’s life, Nina discovers things about her sister that leave her questioning just how well she knew her and she is faced with some dangerous truths that shake the foundations of her life, career and family.

Using this narrative, the reader experiences the story from Nina’s perspective and watches her struggle to connect the pieces of Marie’s life as her own crashes around her. We see her try to continue with family life, being a dutiful wife and mother, trying to support her parents while avoiding their pre-existing issues. Her frustrations at not being able to connect the dots between the things she uncovers in Marie’s life feel very real and I have to admit that at times, I did want to scream and shout on her behalf.

The superb atmosphere created in the book helps the reader feel connected with the narrative, you can see the detailed locations mentioned in the book, you can smell the odours, experience unease at the situations that occur … this is an intense and enthralling read. The themes explored throughout are powerful ones, and I feel that Conlin has used a respectful and sensitive approach to ensure that readers form their own opinions based on what they read, and astutely whilst the actions and dialogue of the characters offer opposing views, it is ultimately left open for the reader to make the final decision about what is morally acceptable when it comes to secrets, mental health, domestic abuse and how we deal with them socially.

A hugely powerful read, wrought with complex and human characters who live on in your head long after you’ve finished reading. It reminds you to take note of those around you and hold them close, not take too much for granted and to tear down the barriers that separate us.

My thanks to Love Books Group for inviting me to be part of the blog tour for this book, and to Black and White Publishing for my review copy.

Read Full Post »

Today’s Celebrating Indie Publishing joins up with the blog tour for Claire MacLeary’s third book in the series featuring PIs Maggie Laird and Wilma Harcus in Aberdeen. Having read and loved the previous books, I was very excited to be involved with the buzz for the new book, Runaway. Claire MacLeary is a name you want to remember her books are fantastic!

  • Title: Runaway
  • Author: Claire MacLeary
  • Publisher: Contraband
  • Publication Date: 14th March 2019

Early copy received from publisher for review purposes.

Description:

When Aberdeen housewife Debbie Milne abruptly vanishes, her husband is frantic with worry and turns to local PIs Maggie Laird and Big Wilma Harcus.

Maggie is reluctant to take on a misper case, but Wilma cajoles her into a covert operation trawling women s refuges and homeless squats in search of a lead. But when a woman’s body is discovered in a skip, the unlikely investigators are dragged into a deeper mystery involving people-trafficking, gambling and prostitution and they’re in deadly danger.

With the police struggling to make headway and the clock ticking, the race is on for Harcus and Laird to find answers, further straining their already fraying relationship.

With Runaway, Claire MacLeary delivers the goods again creating a surprising, gritty, fast-paced tale with the warmth and wit of women of a certain age.

My Thoughts:

Where to start … well if you’re unfamiliar with this series, I would highly recommend checking out the previous books, Cross Purpose and Burnout and getting to know the force of nature that is ‘Big Wilma’ and her business partner Maggie, they are by far some of the best characters I’ve ever met in a book.

In Runaway, the reader is faced with a frantic man searching for his wife who seems to have vanished, his phone call to the emergency services starts the book with bang. Who is the missing woman, what has happened to her, where has she gone, is there more to her disappearance than meets the eye … so many questions based on an opening chapter!
As the police investigation develops and the frantic husband, Scott begins to lose faith with the detectives and hires Harcus and Laird to look into the disappearance of his wife Debbie. Unbeknownst to Scott, the police investigation has picked up some speed and with information from another branch of Police Scotland, the case is soon escalated to CID which should mean that Harcus and Laird step back and allow the police to do their work. Big Wilma firmly has the bit between her teeth with this case and is adamant she will not give this case up. After the previous case that the agency worked on, the women are keen not to make the same mistakes again, and Maggie especially is wary of taking things at face value, and tries to push back on Wilma every time her dogged determination tries to take over or push her.

With two such strong characters it’s hard for readers not to connect with them. Billed as ‘women of a certain age’, they certainly don’t feel outdated or difficult to like, they are what I would think of as “normal” women, trying to make a living doing something they are actually good at whilst juggling running a household, family, life … admirable really. The thing I found most appealing about these characters is the way that they secretly want to be a little more like the other. Wilma, always impressed at the vocabulary that Maggie possesses, seems to want to expand on her knowledge, wants to use the intelligence she clearly already has and it’s wonderful to see this develop through the book. Maggie often seems as though she wishes she had Wilma’s confidence and sure-footedness in many situations and slowly begins to take chances with it.
Underneath their often heated exchanges, is a genuine care for each other, these women may not have started out at best friends, but there’s a strong friendship between them which has grown with each new book in the series, I’ve loved seeing how these two vastly different women have not only formed a lasting friendship but become the emotional support that the other needed.

If strong characterisation wasn’t enough to make this book a winner, then it has to be said that the writing itself is a thing of beauty! Hailing from the Granite City, I know a lot of the landmarks and settlements mentioned within the book and Claire MacLeary distills their essence perfectly. Even down to the little details such as the railings inside the Dutch Mill hotel and pub. She brings the people and the places of Aberdeen alive and shows that no matter the city, there is always a side to things you may not be aware of. And as Maggie and Wilma work their way through their investigation, their paths crisscross through some dark and dangerous streets, MacLeary ensures that readers can ‘feel’ the danger that lurks in the shadows ahead, she makes sure they can ‘sense’ the dread and anticipation, but most of all she takes some truly difficult themes and makes them understandable, writing them in a way that does not simplify or remove any of the severity surrounding them.

A gripping, dark and gritty read that is the perfect addition to the series and I truly cannot wait to see what Claire MacLeary writes next! If you ever get the chance to see Claire talking at a book festival, or even just see her in the crowd, do say hello. She is one of the loveliest people, and genuinely wonderful to speak to!

Read Full Post »

The second of my reviews today comes from a vastly different book, this time a book called The Silver Moon Storybook written by Elaine Gunn and illustrated by Megan MacPhie.

  • Title: The Silver Moon Storybook
  • Author: Elaine Gunn
  • Publisher: Self published

Early copy received from the author for review purposes.

Description:

What darkness lies in the past of a little witch, cursed into the shape of a giant? Who will save a magical unicorn, imprisoned for generations in the castle of a tyrant? As the silver moon rises in the sky, an enormous clown and a powerful siren join a humble weaver and other enchanting characters in these haunting tales of illusion, discovery and love.

An exquisitely illustrated bedtime story for the age of #MeToo, The Silver Moon Storybook transforms themes of modern feminism into touching fables full of the magic and shadows of traditional fairy tales.

My Thoughts:

The words of Elaine Gunn are brought to life with the impressive artwork of Megan MacPhie in what I believe is Gunn’s first published book. And what an intriguing book this is, with a cast of characters that are crafted with detail and clear personalities.

Each of the tales within this book features a strong female character that found a sense of freedom from the ties that bound her in the beginning. There are also themes of love, loss and relationships throughout the tales, which make for thought provoking reading.
The notion that these are modern feminist tales will attract many readers, the magical creatures and wonderful illustrations will also appeal to the audience, but there is a feeling of reality in all of this. Stick with me on this train of thought, but even in a tale featuring witches, unicorns or giant spiders, there are characters who can rely on each other, support each other or just be allies in times of need. These characters can be all female, they can be all male or they can be a mixture of both sexes and show an accurate portrayal of modern struggles – therefore making this feel very current and real for modern life.

I this book would be worthy addition to any bookshelf, the tales themselves are magical and entertaining for readers who just want to read the story, but perhaps for those who want to read between the lines, who want to explore the themes and deeper meanings of the text then this is also an idea read. There are so many different things you can take from The Silver Moon Storybook. It’s one of those that I read at leisure, taking the time to enjoy each story, think about what I read and the meanings behind it before moving on to the next story. The handy note section at the back of the book providing ample space for me to jot down thoughts about what I had read, and means that when I undoubtedly go back to read this book again, I will be able to see if the story still conjures the same ideas as before.

I don’t often mention the cover of books, but in this case I want to make an exception. The Silver Moon Storybook is an exquisite book, from the beautiful purple cover, to the flowing silver image and font … it’s eye catching and hard to resist.


Read Full Post »

41eXpV9TURL._SX351_BO1,204,203,200_ (1)

** My thanks for Love Books Group and the author for my copy of this book and for inviting me to be part of the blog tour **

 

Description:

Bertie the Buffalo is based on a true story of when a Water Buffalo escaped from a Buffalo Park in Fife, near Dundee, Scotland.

A rhyming book about the adventures Bertie got up to and how he safely returned home, demonstrating how important each of us is no matter how insignificant we feel.

Bertie felt that no one noticed him. But he didn’t need to think that as we are all special. We are all a part of one big family.  

Our Thoughts:

Bertie the Buffalo is a charming tale about a wee buffalo who went on an adventure one day, even though he knew he shouldn’t.

With lovely, bright artwork, this is a story that will delight readers old and young as they discover the world around Bertie as he goes on his journey through woods, caves, meets new animals and sees new sights. The rhyming narrative makes this a fun read for youngsters, making it easier for them to absorb the meaning behind the tale. That no matter who you are and what side size you are, you are still special, you mean something to those around you and you belong.

Both my daughter and I enjoyed reading about Bertie and what he got up to, seeing how he reacted to the things he discovered and she really liked it when Bertie got home to the farm and his huge family. I think this will probably be a regular read in the bedtime collection, seems to be a firm favourite with my wee one that’s for sure.

You can buy a copy of Bertie the Buffalo via Amazon UK

 

About the Author:

Award Winning Author Wendy H. Jones lives in Scotland, and her police procedural series featuring Detective Inspector Shona McKenzie, is set in the beautiful city of Dundee, Scotland. Wendy has led a varied and adventurous life. Her love for adventure led to her joining the Royal Navy to undertake nurse training. After six years in the Navy she joined the Army where she served as an Officer for a further 17 years. This took her all over the world including Europe, the Middle East and the Far East. Much of her spare time is now spent travelling around the UK, and lands much further afield. As well as nursing Wendy also worked for many years in Academia. This led to publication in academic textbooks and journals. Killer’s Countdown is her first novel and the first book in the Shona McKenzie Mystery series. Killer’s Crew won the Books Go Social Book of the Year 2107. There are now six books in this series with Killer’s Crypt being released in August, 2017. The Dagger’s Curse is the first book in The Fergus and Flora Mysteries for Young Adults. This book is currently shortlisted for the Woman Alive Magazine Readers Choice Award Book of the Year. She is also a highly successful marketer and she shares her methods in the book, Power Packed Book Marketing.

 

bertie-buffalo.jpg

Read Full Post »

write4bairns

Writing for Kids

The Auld (Woolly) Alliance

When a Scottish Knitwear and Toy Designer and a French Compulsive Knitter Meet...

Put it in Writing

The Blog & Website of Anne Stormont Author: Writing, Reading, Reflecting

bibliobeth

“A room without books is like a body without a soul.” - Cicero

Not Another Book Blogger

Reading, Writing, Drinking Tea

BookBum

A friendly space for all mystery, crime & thriller lovers

Broadbean's Books

Welcome to my blog where I share my thoughts on books.

Audio Killed the Bookmark

Two Girls Who Love To Read Spreading the Love For All Things Bookish! 💕📚🎧

Me and My Books

Books, book reviews and bookish news.

The Beardy Book Blogger

Reading and Reviewing Books - May Contain Beard: "From Tiny Book Blog Buds Shall Mighty Book Blogs Grow" - TBBB

Book lovers' booklist

Book news and reviews

Rosepoint Publishing

Blogger-Book Blogger–Book Reviews of Bestsellers & Indie Authors

Crime Thriller Fella

Crime reviews, news, mayhem, all the usual

juliapalooza.com

Books, bakes and bunnies

A Knight's Reads

All things bookish

Letter Twenty

it's all about the tea

On The Shelf Books

A bookblog for readers

Gem's Quiet Corner

Welcome to my little corner. Grab a cup of tea (or hot drink of preference), find your happy place and join me to talk all things bookish...