Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Nordic Noir’

5152d5oxwwl-_sy346_

** My thanks to Anne Cater & Karen Sullivan for my copy of this novel and for inviting me to be part of the blog tour **

 

Description:

Crime reporter Henning Juul thought his life was over when his young son was murdered. But that was only the beginning…

Determined to find his son’s killer, Henning doggedly follows an increasingly dangerous trail, where dark hands from the past emerge to threaten everything. His ex-wife Nora is pregnant with another man’s child, his sister Trine is implicated in the fire that killed his son and, with everyone he thought he could trust seemingly hiding something, Henning has nothing to lose … except his own life.

Packed with tension and unexpected twists, Killed is the long-awaited finale of one of the darkest, most chilling and emotive series you may ever read. Someone will be killed. But who?

My Thoughts & Review:

The Henning Juul series was one that I discovered late, frankly too late for it to be acceptable.  I started on book four of the series and absolutely loved everything about the book so went back and bought the previous books to work through at my leisure.  Now I have the final book of the series in my hands, and I’m not ready to say goodbye to this character….

For those not familiar with the writing style of Thomas Enger, allow me to foolishly try to sum it up, gripping, gritty, dark, emotive and spectacular.  There are so many more ways to describe it but I don’t think I can find the perfect words to convey how brilliant it is.

Henning Juul is a man on a mission, he wants to find out who was behind the fire that killed his son and will stop at nothing to find out, even if it means placing his life in the utmost danger.  His role as a crime reporter grants him access to some of the shadiest characters and their secrets, but that’s only if they stay alive long enough to share those secrets with Henning.    I am loathe to say much about the plot of this novel, there are so many clever aspects to it, and Enger has surpassed himself with this book.  Whilst clues are dangled tantalisingly close to you as a reader, you cannot quite see them through the mists and you almost don’t want to guess ahead.  You want to be kept in the dark, you want to see what’s lurking in the shadows of Enger’s mind and see where he plans to take his characters and join them on the thrilling ride.

The prologue at the beginning of the book really pulls a reader in and has them almost wanting to launch the book across the room (please don’t, you will either break your electronic device or your book, and scare any animals around you), it’s powerful stuff and so fantastically written that it makes you hold your breath in anticipation/worry.

I absolutely loved the development of characters in this, and even when I was supposed to dislike a character because of their actions, I couldn’t help but feel some shred of sympathy towards them, kudos to you Mr Enger!  The link between Henning Juul and his ex wife Nora was always going to be a delicate one, they loved one another once, they had a child together, and they suffered his death.  But the way that these two are written is fantastic, their bond is probably stronger after what has happened and instead of ripping them apart, it has almost made them better friends and support for each other.
The rawness of emotion that is woven throughout the plot is what makes this book stand out for me, lies and secrets bring so many things with them, but the emotions attached to them are what makes them more potent and here Enger stamps his mark on Nordic Noir with writing that leeches from the pages, gets under the skin of readers and leaves them feeling so tied to the characters and the story.

An utterly enthralling offering from one of my favourite crime fiction writers, and I would recommend that you do check out the soundcloud link at the back of the book to listen to the beautiful piece of music composed by Thomas Enger, it’s breathtaking!

Alas, now I have to say goodbye to Henning Juul…….*sobs*

You can buy a copy of Killed via:

Wordery
Book Depository
Amazon UK

About the Author:

Thomas Enger (b. 1973) is a former journalist. He made his debut with the crime novel Burned (Skinndod) in 2009, which became an international sensation before publication. Burned is the first in a series of 5 books about the journalist Henning Juul, which delves into the depths of Oslo’s underbelly, skewering the corridors of dirty politics and nailing the fast-moving world of 24-hour news. Rights to the series have been sold to 26 countries to date. In 2013 Enger published his first book for young adults, a dark fantasy thriller called The Evil Legacy, for which he won the U-prize (best book Young Adult). Enger also composes music, and he lives in Oslo.


Don’t forget to check out the other stops on the blog tour, there are some brilliant reviews and guest posts to read – why not check back on the previous days to catch up on what you might have missed too?  Don’t forget to check out the blog for my co-host Liz Loves Books today!

 

Killed Blog Tour Poster

 

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Ok, so I said I was taking a break in January and I am……but when the opportunity to share my review of the brilliant Dark Pines came up I just had to join the blog tour!  So here we are, my reivew of Will Dean’s stunning Dark Pines and I am delighted to say that Will Dean will also be appearing at Granite Noir in Aberdeen in February and I may just have to author stalk him for an autograph…..

 

51rlx-wznfl

** My thanks to Margot at One World for my copy of this book **

 

Description:

An isolated Swedish town.

A deaf reporter terrified of nature.

A dense spruce forest overdue for harvest.

A pair of eyeless hunters found murdered in the woods.

It’s week one of the Swedish elk hunt and the sound of gunfire is everywhere. When Tuva Moodyson investigates the story that could make her career she stumbles on a web of secrets that knit Gavrik town together. Are the latest murders connected to the Medusa killings twenty years ago? Is someone following her? Why take the eyes? Tuva must face her demons and venture deep into the woods to stop the killer and write the story. And then get the hell out of Gavrik.

My Thoughts & Review:

Doesn’t that description just scream intrigue?!  I love Nordic Noir, something about the cold and brooding setting just makes these books utterly divine and I was thrilled to get the chance to read an early copy of Dark Pines by Will Dean to experience Sweden in such a suffocatingly frightening way.

From the very outset let me just say that I LOVED this book!  I started reading it whilst the little one went swimming with my husband and was almost shocked when they reappeared to announce it was time to go home.  I had failed to notice the passing of time, not drunk my cuppa or even opened the jaffa cakes – the book was that interesting.

The setting of this novel is intoxicating, dangerous yet beautiful and so perfectly described.  Will Dean brings the woods alive to the point that they’re almost like another character in the book.  The opening pages of the book set the dark tone well, giving readers a real idea of the danger that lurks in the woods and just how easy it is for an accident (or worse) to happen and there be no one there to help you.
The way that the woods are a link between the crimes and the characters is fascinating, and even more so because our protagonist is afraid of them.

Tuva Moodyson is an exceptional character, there was just something about her that I found fascinating.  Whether it was her journalistic skills, her great taste in food or her determination to conquer her fear, but one thing’s for certain, she’s brilliant.  One of the the things about her that stands out is the fact that she’s deaf, and how she views it as nothing more than another part of her character.  By that, I mean that she accepts it, doesn’t like people making a point of it or commending her on being able to speak clearly without any telltale signs of her deafness.  I found the passages about her caring for her hearing aids quite interesting, not something I’ve ever had contact with before so wasn’t aware of how static or electrical pulses could cause irritation for wearers, or the importance of keeping them dry.  Do love the feeling that a book has imparted a little knowledge.

If having Tuva wasn’t interesting enough, there is a cast of colourful characters to delight readers.  From the woodcarving sisters, who I won’t lie, creeped the hell out of me, the very odd taxi driver and his son (there’s a story there that needs to be expanded upon!), and the shut in writer are just some of the extremely intriguing beings in Dark Pines.  And they ways that they are written, my goodness I could see them, smell the aromas around their homes, feel the hostility around them…..exceptional writing!

I mentioned food when speaking about Tuva earlier, and that’s because food plays a big part in the plot.  In moments of panic or fear, Tuva seeks out her friend who owns a food catering truck, and serves up some of the most delicious sounding food that had my mouth watering at the very mention of it.  But so too did the food cooked by Frida.  Not a book to read when you’re hungry!

The mystery element to the plot is exquisite!  There are so many suspects and valid suspicions for each of their possible motives, but Will Dean knows how to lull readers into the calm and quiet without giving anything away.  His plotting is utterly brilliant, I applaud him for keeping me absolutely hooked, second guessing myself and being completely and utterly wrong about the killer and the motive.

This has to be the book you start 2018 waiting for, it’s everything you want from Nordic Noir, a creeping chill that spreads through you as you get pulled in to the story and cannot put it down!  Get Will Dean on your list of authors to watch out for, this is a name you don’t want to forget!!

 

 

Blog Tour BLACK

Read Full Post »

51rlx-wznfl

** My thanks to Margot at One World for my copy of this book **

 

Description:

An isolated Swedish town.

A deaf reporter terrified of nature.

A dense spruce forest overdue for harvest.

A pair of eyeless hunters found murdered in the woods.

It’s week one of the Swedish elk hunt and the sound of gunfire is everywhere. When Tuva Moodyson investigates the story that could make her career she stumbles on a web of secrets that knit Gavrik town together. Are the latest murders connected to the Medusa killings twenty years ago? Is someone following her? Why take the eyes? Tuva must face her demons and venture deep into the woods to stop the killer and write the story. And then get the hell out of Gavrik.

My Thoughts & Review:

Doesn’t that description just scream intrigue?!  I love Nordic Noir, something about the cold and brooding setting just makes these books utterly divine and I was thrilled to get the chance to read an early copy of Dark Pines by Will Dean to experience Sweden in such a suffocatingly frightening way.

From the very outset let me just say that I LOVED this book!  I started reading it whilst the little one went swimming with my husband and was almost shocked when they reappeared to announce it was time to go home.  I had failed to notice the passing of time, not drunk my cuppa or even opened the jaffa cakes – the book was that interesting.

The setting of this novel is intoxicating, dangerous yet beautiful and so perfectly described.  Will Dean brings the woods alive to the point that they’re almost like another character in the book.  The opening pages of the book set the dark tone well, giving readers a real idea of the danger that lurks in the woods and just how easy it is for an accident (or worse) to happen and there be no one there to help you.
The way that the woods are a link between the crimes and the characters is fascinating, and even more so because our protagonist is afraid of them.

Tuva Moodyson is an exceptional character, there was just something about her that I found fascinating.  Whether it was her journalistic skills, her great taste in food or her determination to conquer her fear, but one thing’s for certain, she’s brilliant.  One of the the things about her that stands out is the fact that she’s deaf, and how she views it as nothing more than another part of her character.  By that, I mean that she accepts it, doesn’t like people making a point of it or commending her on being able to speak clearly without any telltale signs of her deafness.  I found the passages about her caring for her hearing aids quite interesting, not something I’ve ever had contact with before so wasn’t aware of how static or electrical pulses could cause irritation for wearers, or the importance of keeping them dry.  Do love the feeling that a book has imparted a little knowledge.

If having Tuva wasn’t interesting enough, there is a cast of colourful characters to delight readers.  From the woodcarving sisters, who I won’t lie, creeped the hell out of me, the very odd taxi driver and his son (there’s a story there that needs to be expanded upon!), and the shut in writer are just some of the extremely intriguing beings in Dark Pines.  And they ways that they are written, my goodness I could see them, smell the aromas around their homes, feel the hostility around them…..exceptional writing!

I mentioned food when speaking about Tuva earlier, and that’s because food plays a big part in the plot.  In moments of panic or fear, Tuva seeks out her friend who owns a food catering truck, and serves up some of the most delicious sounding food that had my mouth watering at the very mention of it.  But so too did the food cooked by Frida.  Not a book to read when you’re hungry!

The mystery element to the plot is exquisite!  There are so many suspects and valid suspicions for each of their possible motives, but Will Dean knows how to lull readers into the calm and quiet without giving anything away.  His plotting is utterly brilliant, I applaud him for keeping me absolutely hooked, second guessing myself and being completely and utterly wrong about the killer and the motive.

This has to be the book you start 2018 waiting for, it’s everything you want from Nordic Noir, a creeping chill that spreads through you as you get pulled in to the story and cannot put it down!  Get Will Dean on your list of authors to watch out for, this is a name you don’t want to forget!!

 

 

Read Full Post »

Hello and welcome along to The Quiet Knitter! It’s Friday, and that means it’s time for another post to showcase an independent publisher and one of their books!
This week I am delighted to bring you a book from No Exit Press, these guys are fast becoming one of my favourite publishers with the fantastic selection of books they’ve published this year!  So many that I may end up having to do a top ten books of the year from each indie publisher at this rate!!


Today’s book in the spotlight is The Frozen Woman by Jon Michelet.

Description:

51dg5t97a2bl-_sx324_bo1204203200_

 

A FROZEN BODY.

A MURDERED BIKER.

A LAWYER WITH NOTHING LEFT TO LOSE.

In the depths of the Norwegian winter, a woman s frozen corpse is discovered in the garden of a notorious ex-lawyer, Vilhelm Thygesen. She has been stabbed to death.

A young biker, a member of a gang once represented by the lawyer, is found dead in suspicious circumstances.

Thygesen starts receiving anonymous threats, and becomes ensnared in a web of violence, crime and blackmail that spreads across Northern Europe.

Does the frozen woman hold the key?

 

My Thoughts & Review:

As a fan of Nordic Noir I was really keen to read this book after seeing the description, it jumped out to me as something I would enjoy and sounded very intriguing.

Interestingly , the plot of this book encompasses more than just the frozen woman, there is blackmail, politics to consider too, and as the opening chapter develops we also encounter biker gangs.  With so many strands to the plot I did wonder how this would all fit together and certainly the style of writing makes a reader work for the answers.  The author manages to weave together the different aspects of the plot whilst slowly revealing bits and pieces without giving the game away, almost like one of those crazy blurred images that slowly comes into focus as you watch it.  And once you see the full picture you feel a great satisfaction at being able to finally see the whole thing.   As ever I am trying very hard not to give anything away about the plot, I hate spoilers and would hate to ruin this book for others.

This is a book that requires attention and time when reading, I found that there were a few times that I paused my reading to go back a page or two to be sure of what I was reading, or in one particular case to double check a character name because I’d gotten confused, but I suspect that this is due to the complexity of the names and my irritating need to try and sound them out (and mispronounce them atrociously) whilst I read.  There were a couple of things that I did feel passed me by, especially about the political conditions in Norway, perhaps they read better in the original Norwegian and something was lost in translation?

Characterisation was very good, Stribolt is a character that I think some readers will relate to, especially the unsent resignation letters.  However, I felt that I didn’t get much of an understanding or connection to Vaarge.  

Overall an interesting plot, well written and keeps the reader guessing with twists and turns cleverly scattered throughout.

 

You can buy a copy of The Frozen Woman via:

No Exit Press (publisher)
Amazon UK
Wordery
Book Depository

 

** My thanks to Katherine Sunderland at No Exit Press for my copy of this book and for taking part in Celebrating Indie Publishing **

 

Read Full Post »

The Man Who Died new front (1)

** My thanks to Karen Sullivan and Anne Cater for my copy of this wonderful book and for inviting me to be part of the blog tour **

 

Description:

A successful entrepreneur in the mushroom industry, Jaakko Kaunismaa is a man in his prime. At just 37 years of age, he is shocked when his doctor tells him that he’s dying. What is more, the cause is discovered to be prolonged exposure to toxins; in other words, someone has slowly but surely been poisoning him. Determined to find out who wants him dead, Jaakko embarks on a suspenseful rollercoaster journey full of unusual characters, bizarre situations and unexpected twists. With a nod to Fargo and the best elements of the Scandinavian noir tradition, The Man Who Died is a page-turning thriller brimming with the blackest comedy surrounding life and death, and love and betrayal, marking a stunning new departure for the King of Helsinki Noir.

My Thoughts & Review:

Having read The Mine by Antti Tuomainen last year and thoroughly loved it, I was ecstatic to discover that he’d been writing The Man Who Died, it sounded so incredibly intriguing and I couldn’t wait to get my hands on a copy (and pre-ordered it from Amazon as soon as the link was available!).

The poisoning idea behind the plot of this book was tantalisingly clever and ensured my attention was grabbed from the outset.  Who would want to poison our protagonist Jakko, what toxins had he been exposed to and just how was this done?  Would he discover who was behind it all in time?  These were just some of the things running through my head when I started reading this book, and I soon started trying to guess the who, the what and the why.  As usual there are no spoilers here and I will avoid speaking about the plot too much because I hate spoilers.

Jakko Kaunismaa is a character I took a liking to quickly, his dark sense of humour appealed to me, his list making struck a chord with me and he really came alive through the wonderful writing in this book.  I felt that the more I read about him, the more invested I became.  His paranoia and the spectrum of emotions he went through seemed so real and believable, and I think this in turn made him quite a relatable character as well as very interesting.  His determination to get to the bottom of the mystery behind who had poisoned him leads him to discoveries about those around him that he would never have previously imagined.
Masterfully Tuomainen merrily leads the reader down some wonderfully mysterious paths, littered with red herrings and clever misdirection that whilst clears up some mysteries, it leaves others devilishly cryptic.  The dark humour that is interwoven throughout just makes this a delight to read and hard to forget.

The translation to English by David Hackston has been done so incredibly well, none of Tuomainen’s subtleties have been lost and this reads very comfortably as if it had originally been written in English.

An excellent thriller which will have readers gripped, it is a book that stands out as being brilliantly different from the norm and is a fantastic example of why Tuomainen is the King of Helsinki Noir!

You can buy a copy of The Man Who Died via:

Orenda eBookstore
Amazon UK
Wordery
Book Depository

Follow the blog tour:

man who died blog poster 2017(1)

orenda-header

 

Read Full Post »

Hello and welcome along to another post to Celebrate Indie Publishing, today I am delighted to share a book from the wonderful Orenda Books, today’s fantastic book featured is “Faithless” by Kjell Ola Dahl and I’m delighted to say that this post is also part of the blog tour for the book.


Book Feature:

Published: 15 April 2017

Description:

Faithless cover(1)

When the body of a woman turns up in a dumpster, scalded and wrapped in plastic, Inspector Frank Frølich is shocked to discover that he knows her—and their recent meetings may hold the clue to her murder. As he begins to look deeper into the tragic events surrounding her death, Frølich’s colleague Gunnarstranda finds another body, and things take a more sinister turn. With a cold case involving the murder of a young girl in northern Norway casting a shadow, and an unsettling number of coincidences clouding the plot, Frølich is forced to look into his own past to find the answers—and the killer—before he strikes again. Dark, brooding and utterly chilling, atmospheric page-turner marks the return of an internationally renowned and award-winning series, from one of the fathers of Nordic Noir.

 

My Thoughts & Review:

Kjell Ola Dahl was not a name that I was familiar with before I heard about this book, and for those out there that are shaking their heads in shock, horror or disbelief, please accept my apologies.  Kjell Ola is lovingly described as the “one of the fathers of Nordic Noir” by  his publisher Orenda Books, and after devouring this book I can see why.

“Faithless” is actually the seventh book in the series following the Oslo detectives Frølich and Gunnarstranda, but happily this book can be read as a stand alone.  I did initially worry that I might struggle to connect with the characters because I came to the series so late but they are written so well that you don’t feel that you’ve missed anything.  The shared history and friendship of the detectives runs in tandem with the main thread of the plot and does not detract from the case at hand, the focus is on the crime and investigation. 

There is something special about Nordic Noir, there’s a realistic simplicity to it, the precise nature of which makes it a joy to read.  This realism shows through in the characterisation, Frølich and Gunnarstranda are time served detectives, they rely on gut instinct and experience rather than modern technology.  The simplicity of doing things the “old fashioned” way gives them an authenticity and fits in so well with the creations I conjured in my head whilst reading.
In keeping with the hallmarks of the genre, there is an unfathomable darkness looming on the horizon.  The tension slowly mounts whilst Dahl masterfully leads his readers on a journey of misdirection and plays with their minds, but all the while the darkness swells until Dahl cunningly stuns his audience and leaves them dumbfounded.  

The plot is clever and the numerous strands of the plot weave so eloquently together to form a conclusion that readers will thoroughly enjoy.

As with any translated book from this publisher, the translation work is superb.  Don Bartlett deserves a huge thank you for taking this wonderful novel and making it read naturally in English.  I will admit that I am somewhat hesitant with some translated books, there is always a worry that subtleties will be lost in conversion into another language, that social or cultural aspects may not comfortably translate but here this is not the case, and I would like to offer my thanks to Don Bartlett for his time and hard work in ensuring that his work is to the highest standard.

You can buy a copy of “Faithless” via:

Amazon
The Book Depository
Wordery
Orenda Books eBookstore


 

Don’t forget to check out the other stops on the blog tour for more reviews, guest posts etc.

kjell

 

orenda-header

 

 

Read Full Post »

Welcome along to The Quiet Knitter’s stop on the blog tour for Thomas Enger’s “Cursed”, I am delighted to share my review of this immensely brilliant thriller with you all.

CURSED AW.indd

Published: 15 February 2017
5 out of 5 stars

Copy provided by Orenda Publishing as part of the blog tour

 

Description:

What secret would you kill to protect?

When Hedda Hellberg fails to return from a retreat in Italy, where she has been grieving for her recently dead father, her husband discovers that his wife’s life is tangled in mystery. Hedda never left Oslo, the retreat has no record of her and, what’s more, she appears to be connected to the death of an old man, gunned down on the first day of the hunting season in the depths of the Swedish forests.

Henning Juul becomes involved in the case when his ex-wife joins in the search for the missing woman, and the estranged pair find themselves enmeshed both in the murky secrets of one of Sweden’s wealthiest families, and in the painful truths surrounding the death of their own son.

With the loss of his son to deal with, as well as threats to his own life and to that of his ex-wife, Juul is prepared to risk everything to uncover a sinister maze of secrets that ultimately leads to the dark heart of European history.

My Thoughts & Review:

When I started this book I didn’t realise this was actually the fourth book in the series following Henning Juul, it reads pretty spectacularly as a stand alone novel, but I have gone and bought the previous three so I can catch up on this wonderful character and the superb writing of Thomas Enger.

Nordic Noir has reached its pinnacle for me with this book, it is breathtakingly brilliant.  Enger grabs his audience with a very dark and disturbing opening, the murder of man out walking his dog in the forest, and takes great care to ensure that the reader is kept gussing as to the connection between the murder victim and the main strands of the plot.  The way in which he masterfully weaves a tangled plot together is something to behold.  When reading this I kept wondering how it would all link up, where it was going but all the while enjoying the deliciously twisted writing.  I am loathe to give away details, it’s cleverly crafted, well structured and all consuming.

Vivid descriptions of Oslo and the surrounding landscapes are mesmerising, I felt that I could conjure clear images from the details given.  The characters are also incredibly detailed, readers cannot help but feel connected to Nora and Henning, there is a powerful bond between these two despite their relationship having been over for some time.  The way in which Thomas Enger writes these characters, especially Henning, makes me desperate to find out more….so book 5 needs to be out pretty soon please!

With most translated novels there is the fear that something will be lost when transcribing from the author’s native language to English, but I have to say the pairing of Thomas Enger and Kari Dickson is something akin to genius!  Dickson’s skills ensure that  this novel reads as though it were originally written in English and none of the subtle nuances are lost.  I am always in awe of the work translators do, and Kari Dickson is one that deserves much praise.

An immensely brilliant thriller from an author I will be watching closely from now on!

You can buy a copy of “Cursed” via Amazon here or directly from Orenda Books eBookstore here

About the Author:

Thomas Enger (b. 1973) is a former journalist. He made his debut with the crime novel Burned (Skinndod) in 2009, which became aninternational sensation before publication. Burned is the first in a series of 5 books about the journalist Henning Juul, which delves into the depths of Oslo’s underbelly, skewering the corridors of dirty politics and nailing the fast-moving world of 24-hour news. Rights to the series have been sold to 26 countries to date. In 2013 Enger published his first book for young adults, a dark fantasy thriller called The Evil Legacy, for which he won the U-prize (best book Young Adult). Enger also composes music, and he lives in Oslo.


Don’t forget to check out the other stops on the blog tour, there are some brilliant reviews and guest posts to read – why not check back on the previous days to catch up on what you might have missed too?

poster

Read Full Post »

Broadbean's Books

Welcome to my blog where I share my thoughts on books.

Audio Killed the Bookmark

Book Reviews for Audiobooks, Ebooks, and Other Digital Forms

Me and My Books

Books, book reviews and bookish news.

The Beardy Book Blogger

Reading and Reviewing Books - May Contain Beard: "From Tiny Book Blog Buds Shall Mighty Book Blogs Grow" - TBBB

Book lovers' booklist

Book news and reviews

Rosepoint Publishing

Book Blogger, Book Reviews, Book Promotion

Crime Thriller Fella

Crime reviews, news, mayhem, all the usual

juliapalooza.com

Books, bakes and bunnies

A Knight's Reads

All things bookish

On The Shelf Books

A bookblog for readers

Gem's Quiet Corner

Welcome to my little corner. Grab a cup of tea, find your happy place and join me to talk all things books...

Creating Perfection

Delicately balancing the voice of the author with the needs of the reader

Hooked From Page One

A Crime Readers Blog

THE CHLOE DOUGLAS BLOG

A LIFESTYLE BLOG WITH PLENTY OF BOOK REVIEWS

Books and Wine Gums

Reviews of all-sorts (but not liquorice-based confections)

The Pioneer Woman

Plowing through Life in the Country...One Calf Nut at a Time