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Posts Tagged ‘Runaway’

Hard to believe that we’re half way through the year already, and as we’ve hit this milestone, I figured that it might be a good time to round up some of the great indie books that I’ve featured so far and some of the great authors who have given their time to take part in author interviews or written guest posts for us to read.

Links to each of the Friday features are below, or alternatively if you want to use the search function at the top of the page, just type in the name of the book or author to bring up the relevant page.

Feature Links:
Call Me Star Girl by Louise Beech (book feature)
The Twitches Meet a Puppy by Hayley Scott (book feature)
Fractured Winter by Alison Baillie (book feature)
Inborn by Thomas Enger (book feature)
Roz White (author feature)
Beton Rouge by Simone Buchholz (book feature)
The Courier by Kjell Old Dahl (book feature)
The Red Light Zone by Jeff Zycinski (book feature)
A Letter From Sarah by Dan Proops (book and author feature)
The Silver Moon Storybook by Elaine Gunn (book feature)
Runaway by Claire MacLeary (book feature)
Sunwise by Helen Steadman (book feature)
The Lives Before Us by Juliet Conlin (book feature)
The Red Gene by Barbara Lamplugh (book and author feature)
Death at The Plague Museum by Lesley Kelly (book feature)
Heleen Kist (author feature)
White Gold by David Barker (book feature)
Sonny and Me by Ross Sayers (book and author feature)
Claire MacLeary (author feature)
A History of Magic and Witchcraft: Sabbats, Satan and Superstitions in the West by Frances Timbers (book feature)
The Killer Across The Table by John E. Douglas & Mark Olshaker (book feature)
Maggie Christensen (author feature)

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I love how much this Friday feature has grown and the support that it’s had out there from bloggers, authors, publishers and readers has been amazing, and it’s a huge honour to be able to shine a spotlight on some wonderful books and the authors behind them.

Today I am thrilled to shine the spotlight on Claire MacLeary, author of the Harcus and Laird series. The series includes Burnout, Cross Purpose and Runaway, links to the reviews of these can be found here.


Author Feature:

Glasgow-born Claire MacLeary worked in advertising, HR, and later as a training consultant in Edinburgh and London before her husband’s job entailed a move to Aberdeen. There she became an antiques dealer and entrepreneur. Back in Fife, she ran a number of successful businesses before studying for a MLitt degree in Creative Writing at the University of Dundee.

Her debut novel, Cross Purpose, was shortlisted for Harrogate New Blood and longlisted for the 2017 McIlvanney Prize. A sequel, Burnout, was longlisted for The 2018 Hearst Big Book Awards. Runaway, third in the Harcus & Laird series was published in March 2019.

Claire now lives in Glasgow and St Andrews.

When my first novel launched at Aberdeen’s 2017 Granite Noir, little did I think, a scant two years on, I’d have brought three books into the world and embarked on a fourth. The road to publication has been bumpy – jobs, kids and travel getting in the way. As my children grew, I enrolled in one evening class after another, tried my hand at short stories, had the minor thrill of seeing some in print. But it wasn’t until 2010 I set about writing seriously. A window of opportunity allowed me to study, full-time, for a year.

My first writing folio comprised a short story and an extract from a crime novel. Until that date, I hadn’t read much crime, but the genre seemed to suit my spare prose. That extract was to become the first scene of Cross Purpose, which I developed – with many re-drafts – in between business and family commitments over the next few years.

I submitted the finished manuscript direct to a couple of publishers, and was fortunate to receive an offer from Sara Hunt of Saraband Books, who was looking to expand her Contraband crime imprint.  What sold the book to her? I’d done extensive research, and decided there was a gap in the market which my protagonists – two non-professional women ‘of a certain age’ – might fill. Ordinary women, juggling homes and jobs and childcare. Women to whom readers could relate. I’d met many such women: resilient, resourceful, with reserves to draw on in a crisis. I wanted to give these unsung women a voice.

Happily, readers took Maggie and ‘Big’ Wilma, my unlikely duo of private investigators, to their hearts. But don’t be deceived, the series isn’t ‘cosy crime’. My books are dark and gritty, espousing big social issues.

I now write full-time, not necessarily every day. I have a dedicated study and write best in the morning, drawing inspiration from writers like Alice Munro, who describes beautifully the minutiae of domestic life. One of my favourite books on motherhood is Carol Shields’ The Stone Diaries.

Driven as I am, I don’t have down-time. If I’m not tapping away at my computer, I’m jotting ideas in black ink on a reporter’s notebook. When I’m ‘in the zone’ I often wake in the night with dialogue running through my head. Then, I might shrug on a sweater and go to my desk or put some lines down on an iPad to be copied and pasted next morning.

I thought nothing could eclipse standing on stage at the McIlvanney Prize award with some of crime’s most celebrated authors, but the very best bit about being an author is when a reader tells you they enjoyed your book. It’s heartening to think your story has captured someone’s imagination and your characters come to life for them.

The worst aspect is the blank page. Without grind, you can’t produce a first draft, which your editor will then proceed to slash and burn! For one as impatient as I, the whole process is tortuously slow. That said, I’m currently working on Book 4, which should launch early next year.

I wouldn’t be so presumptuous as to think readers need my advice. However, having described myself as having “a full life to draw on”, I’d say my motto is, Do It Now!

To aspiring writers who opt to go down the traditional publishing route, success is 95% attributable to hard work and 5% to luck, so be persistent, keep chipping away.

The theme of my latest book, Runaway – another page-turner with the, by now, well-loved cast of characters – is homelessness.

Aberdeen housewife Debbie Milne abruptly vanishes, leaving behind a frantic husband and two young children, and Maggie and Wilma become embroiled in a covert investigation. But when a woman’s disfigured body is found in a skip, the PIs are dragged into a deeper mystery involving people-trafficking, gambling and prostitution – and they’re in deadly danger. With the police struggling for leads and the clock ticking, the race is on for Harcus & Laird to find answers.

If you’re already a fan of Maggie and ‘Big’ Wilma or new to the series, you can purchase a copy at your local bookshop, direct from Saraband Books saraband.net or via this link: clairemacleary.com/buy-runaway

A huge thank you to Claire for joining me today and having a chat, I am a huge fan of her writing so I have to admit to being a little start-struck when she agreed to take part.

To find out more about Claire and her books, check out her website or social media!

Website: clairemacleary.com

Twitter: @clairemacleary

Facebook: www.facebook.com/clairemacleary

Goodreads: clairemacleary.com/goodreads

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Today’s Celebrating Indie Publishing joins up with the blog tour for Claire MacLeary’s third book in the series featuring PIs Maggie Laird and Wilma Harcus in Aberdeen. Having read and loved the previous books, I was very excited to be involved with the buzz for the new book, Runaway. Claire MacLeary is a name you want to remember her books are fantastic!

  • Title: Runaway
  • Author: Claire MacLeary
  • Publisher: Contraband
  • Publication Date: 14th March 2019

Early copy received from publisher for review purposes.

Description:

When Aberdeen housewife Debbie Milne abruptly vanishes, her husband is frantic with worry and turns to local PIs Maggie Laird and Big Wilma Harcus.

Maggie is reluctant to take on a misper case, but Wilma cajoles her into a covert operation trawling women s refuges and homeless squats in search of a lead. But when a woman’s body is discovered in a skip, the unlikely investigators are dragged into a deeper mystery involving people-trafficking, gambling and prostitution and they’re in deadly danger.

With the police struggling to make headway and the clock ticking, the race is on for Harcus and Laird to find answers, further straining their already fraying relationship.

With Runaway, Claire MacLeary delivers the goods again creating a surprising, gritty, fast-paced tale with the warmth and wit of women of a certain age.

My Thoughts:

Where to start … well if you’re unfamiliar with this series, I would highly recommend checking out the previous books, Cross Purpose and Burnout and getting to know the force of nature that is ‘Big Wilma’ and her business partner Maggie, they are by far some of the best characters I’ve ever met in a book.

In Runaway, the reader is faced with a frantic man searching for his wife who seems to have vanished, his phone call to the emergency services starts the book with bang. Who is the missing woman, what has happened to her, where has she gone, is there more to her disappearance than meets the eye … so many questions based on an opening chapter!
As the police investigation develops and the frantic husband, Scott begins to lose faith with the detectives and hires Harcus and Laird to look into the disappearance of his wife Debbie. Unbeknownst to Scott, the police investigation has picked up some speed and with information from another branch of Police Scotland, the case is soon escalated to CID which should mean that Harcus and Laird step back and allow the police to do their work. Big Wilma firmly has the bit between her teeth with this case and is adamant she will not give this case up. After the previous case that the agency worked on, the women are keen not to make the same mistakes again, and Maggie especially is wary of taking things at face value, and tries to push back on Wilma every time her dogged determination tries to take over or push her.

With two such strong characters it’s hard for readers not to connect with them. Billed as ‘women of a certain age’, they certainly don’t feel outdated or difficult to like, they are what I would think of as “normal” women, trying to make a living doing something they are actually good at whilst juggling running a household, family, life … admirable really. The thing I found most appealing about these characters is the way that they secretly want to be a little more like the other. Wilma, always impressed at the vocabulary that Maggie possesses, seems to want to expand on her knowledge, wants to use the intelligence she clearly already has and it’s wonderful to see this develop through the book. Maggie often seems as though she wishes she had Wilma’s confidence and sure-footedness in many situations and slowly begins to take chances with it.
Underneath their often heated exchanges, is a genuine care for each other, these women may not have started out at best friends, but there’s a strong friendship between them which has grown with each new book in the series, I’ve loved seeing how these two vastly different women have not only formed a lasting friendship but become the emotional support that the other needed.

If strong characterisation wasn’t enough to make this book a winner, then it has to be said that the writing itself is a thing of beauty! Hailing from the Granite City, I know a lot of the landmarks and settlements mentioned within the book and Claire MacLeary distills their essence perfectly. Even down to the little details such as the railings inside the Dutch Mill hotel and pub. She brings the people and the places of Aberdeen alive and shows that no matter the city, there is always a side to things you may not be aware of. And as Maggie and Wilma work their way through their investigation, their paths crisscross through some dark and dangerous streets, MacLeary ensures that readers can ‘feel’ the danger that lurks in the shadows ahead, she makes sure they can ‘sense’ the dread and anticipation, but most of all she takes some truly difficult themes and makes them understandable, writing them in a way that does not simplify or remove any of the severity surrounding them.

A gripping, dark and gritty read that is the perfect addition to the series and I truly cannot wait to see what Claire MacLeary writes next! If you ever get the chance to see Claire talking at a book festival, or even just see her in the crowd, do say hello. She is one of the loveliest people, and genuinely wonderful to speak to!

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